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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Long Lost Lake, White Earth Reservation


It is located 14 miles to the north of Pine Point. It is within Long Lost Lake Township which has a population of 43 according to the 2010 census. Originally, Long Lost Lake Township was within South Clearwater Unorganized Territory. There are 121 housing units in South Clearwater Unorganized Territory. Whites make up 64% of the unorganized territory's population of 72. Chippewa's make up 36% of the population or around 25. Most Chippewa's live at Long Lost Lake. And their population is higher. Nearly all the housing units are located on a peninsula along the southern shores of Long Lost Lake (Ga-mi Gi-no Ah-no), which had around 20 or more housing units. Around a 1/4 are mobile homes. Long Lost Lake is located along Reservation Highway 22. Using google earth you can clearly see a flood hit the area. Several of the homes were submerged by the flood waters. The population of Long Lost Lake where the flood or peninsula is (it's obviously a permanent settlement), was probably between 40 and 60, before the flood. However, it is lower now as a result of the flood. Possibly between 30 and 40. As many as eight of the housing units were flooded. Now there may be only 15 or so housing units. Most of the residents are probably Indian.



Indian citizens of White Clay Reservation, need to monitor the activities of the whites in this part of their Reservation. Whites claim that part of the Reservation was ceded yet they are covering up the fact that White Earth Reservation is connected to Leech Lake Reservation by way of Upper Rice Lake and Leech Lake Reservation is connected to Red Lake Reservation by way of Turtle Lake or all three Reservations are connected and the same Reservation. If they don't monitor the whites, the whites will establish themselves in greater numbers there. It's location is very wild. In fact, it is the last frontier of the Reservation. Along with Maple Grove Township, Long Lost Lake Township is an undeveloped land that is not protected. It must be protected and the Indian citizens of White Earth Reservation must be allowed to exploit that land area. There are quite a few housing units (up to 75, and that's not counting the housing units of the community of Long Lost Lake) located around Long Lost Lake, which means most are used by vacationers. Below are several google earth photos of the flood and of Long Lost Lake, White Earth Reservation.



Long Lost Lake From Above

Long Lost Lake From Above

Long Lost Lake From Above

Long Lost Lake From Above

Flooded Long Lost Lake From Above

Flooded Long Lost Lake From Above

Flooded Long Lost Lake From Above

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