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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Assiniboine 76 Reserve & First Nation


This Reserve goes by the name of Assiniboine 76 yet is properly known as Carry The Kettle. Below are google earth photos of Carry The Kettle Reserve. According to the 2011 census, Assiniboine 76 Reserve has an on-Reserve population of 673. That does not include off-Reserve population. There are 171 housing units at Assiniboine 76. Average household size is near 3.9 persons per household. Chief Piapot agreed to relocate from the Cypress Hills to Assiniboine 76 Reserve, after signing an adhesion to Treaty 4 on September 9, 1875. That's according to historians. However, they also wrote that chief Piapot along with other Ojibway chiefs, wanted a Reserve in the Cypress Hills which means chief Piapot was from Montana and fled up to Montana during the Ojibway Exodus out of Montana to the Cypress Hills of Alberta and Saskatchewan, in 1877. Supposedly chief Piapot made his home in the beautiful Qu'Appelle River Valley after ending his military career. He was born in 1816. Chief Piapot settled his Saulteaux Ojibwa subjects at Assiniboine 76 Reserve in August of 1883. Historians claim these Saulteaux Ojibwa's led by chief Piapot, settled on a Reserve adjacent to Assiniboine 76 Reserve which indicates they are liars. There was possibly a large Ojibway Reserve along the Qu'Appelle River Valley, between the Qu'Appelle Lakes Reserve and Crooked Lakes Reserve and included Assiniboine 76 Reserve and File Hills Reserve and possibly the Touchwood Hills Reserves. After Saulteaux Ojibwa leaders understood they had been lied to, chief Big Bear and other Ojibway leaders, agreed for war. That war is historically known as the 1885 Northwest Rebellion.



On September 25, 1877 Ojibway leaders in the Cypress Hills agreed to sign treaty with England. However, they demanded a Reserve in the Cypress Hills. These Saulteaux Ojibway People are also known as Assiniboine. In Ojibwa, Assiniboine means Rocky Ojibwa's or Stony Ojibwa's. The "assini" means rocky and stony, while the "bwan" means Ojibwa's. In Ojibwa, the plural is an "n". So Oji-bwan is correct. The correct meaning of Assini-bwan is Iron Confederation. According to the 1832 Edinburgh Encyclopedia, the Ojibway Military forced their way east, from a westerly location, in two groups. One came up from the southwest (probably Kansas-Oklahoma) and forced their way to Ohio then the Atlantic Coast, while the other forced their way east in a parallel line. They settled along the St. Lawrence River Valley. Though Edinburgh Encyclopedia wrote they were Assiniboine, we know from history that the first white explorers to explore the St. Lawrence River Valley in the early 16th century, found non Algonquian People living there. When the whites returned to the St. Lawrence River Valley in the very early 17th century, they found Algonquians living there. So some time during the mid 16th century, the Ojibwa's from the Alberta and Montana region, forced their way to the St. Lawrence River Valley.



In June of 1882, some of the first Saulteaux Ojibwa's from the Cypress Hills settled on their Reserve where Indian Head, Saskatchewan is located. It's 16 miles southeast of the Qu'Appelle Lakes Reserve and 10 miles northwest of Assiniboine 76 Reserve. This Reserve was for chief Piapot. It bordered Qu'Appelle Lakes Reserve on the north and Assiniboine 76 Reserve on the south. It's really Assiniboine 76 Reserve. This Ojibway Reserve along Qu'Appelle River Valley may have extended some 90 miles from east to west and 50 miles from north to south. It may have covered around 4,500 sq. mi. or 11,654 sq. km.



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The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




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