Gamblers First Nation


This Ojibway community is located in southwestern Manitoba. Below are google earth photos of one of this Reserves communities. Chief Gambler was their leader during Treaty 4 negotiations and was possibly put in power by Canada or not a real Ojibway leader. Real Ojibway leaders of those times, came from their military and police totem. His name of Gambler, suggests he was a man who had money or could be bribed. A land surrender dating back to 1881, has caused friction between Gamblers First Nation and Waywayseecappo. Both were a same Reserve until that illegal 1881 land surrender. A map i drew of this Reserve created in 1877, is below. Canada probably set aside rather large Ojibway Reserves along Qu'Appele River and Assiniboine River. They be Qu'Appelle Lakes Reserve, Crooked Lakes Reserve and possibly Waywayseecappo Reserve where Gamblers Reserve is now. An area of land almost adjacent to St-Lazare, Manitoba to a location 3.5 miles or 5.6 kilometers southwest of Welby, Saskatchewan looks like an area Ojibway leaders wanted their Reserve to be. They wanted land whites didn't. Gamblers is located in it's etreme north, while Birdtail Sioux is located in it's extreme southeast. Anyway, a land dispute happened in 1881. They reported that Gamblers, Mosquito or Sakimay, Rolling River and Waywayseecappo were in some way affiliated. More Waywayseecappo, Sakimay and Gamblers than Rolling River. They also reported that Sakimay or Mosquito, had a population of 130, with 55 at Fort Walsh, Saskatchewan or Alberta's and Saskatchewan's Cypress Hills which means Montana Ojibway's are involved. Of course, they be Birdtail Sioux.



In 1881, it was reported that Gamblers, Sakimay and Waywayseecappo's population was 490, with 270 at Riding Mountains which are 3 miles or 4.9 kilometers from Waywayseecappo Reserve, or had yet to settle on Reserve. As mentioned, they reported that of Sakimay's 1881 population of 130, 55 were at Fort Walsh or had yet to relocate to their Reserve in southeast Saskatchewan and southwest Manitoba. Those that had yet to settle on their Reserve numbered 325 in 1881. However, those 55 from Sakimay, did settle at their Reserve or Birdtail Sioux Reserve. Most stayed with Waywayseecappo. At Waywayseecappo, they have a town named Birdtail. There were at least 3 Reserves set aside yet possibly 4. They were Gamblers, Sakimay and Waywayseecappo. All were connected. Evidence suggests that Rolling River was their 4th Reserve. Most fled to Riding Mountains or near where Waywayseecappo is located. That's why a land dispute eventually happened. On-Reserve population of Gambler First Nation, is 83 according to a 2016 census. That does not include those Gambler citizens who live in white communities. They have 36 total dwellings with 32 lived in. Average household size is 2.7 persons per household. Ojibway Language is no longer spoken there. Their Reserve was originally larger yet as a result of most refusing to relocate to their 1877 Reserve, an illegal land surrender happened. This is one of chief Rocky Boy's many Reservations and Reserves. Chief Rocky Boy fled to Alberta's and Saskatchewan's Cypress Hills, in 1876. His Montana Ojibway's were with Sakimay's population.



Map of Probable Original Reserve

Satellite Image of Gambler

Birdtail Sioux Road View

Birdtail Sioux Road View

Birdtail Sioux Road View

Birdtail Sioux Road View

Birdtail Sioux Road View

Birdtail Sioux Road View

Free Book


The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




Contact


Copyright 2009-2020 Anishinabe-History.Com