Gull Bay First Nation


This community of Ojibway's at Gull Bay First Nation, live along Gull Bay's west shores. Below are links to google earth photos of their land and a map of their correct Reserve. Gull Bay First Nation is an extension of Lake Nipigon. 1850's Robinson-Superior Treaty was agreed upon by Ojibway leaders who were lied to by whites. White leaders knew land north of Lake Superior was nearly all wetlands and contained an incredible number of small and large lakes. They didn't like it. As one went further north, more unappealing land is. White leaders sent their negotiators to Ojibway leaders and reached a treaty agreement in which they left them a large Reserve known as Gull Bay First Nation. Ojibway leaders considered 1 mile to be 1 league or 3 miles. Nine Ojibway leaders signed 1850's Robinson-Superior Treaty and were left with three large Reserves. Thus, why nine Ojibway leaders signed this 1850 treaty. Chief "Mi-shi Muck-qua" signed for Gull Bay. Chief Supreme Bear and his two sub-chiefs, were each set aside one Reserve. They were not 4 sqaure miles. If they were, Ojibway leaders would have killed English negotiators. Each were 12 miles by 12 miles or 144 square miles or 373 square kilometers. That's 432 square miles or 1,119 square kilometers. Ojibway leaders were content. However, they became enraged afterwards. White leaders lied. This Ojibway Robinson-Superior Reservation community of Gull Bay (aka Guy-ash-ko Wi-kred) or First Naton, has an on-Reserve population of 247, according to a 2016 census. They have 102 dwellings with 79 lived in. Average household size is 3.1 persons per household. Their Reserve is much larger.



Map of Gull Bay Reserve

Satellite Image of Gull Bay Town

Gull Bay Road Closeup

Gull Bay Road Closeup

Gull Bay Road Closeup

Gull Bay Road Closeup

Gull Bay Road Closeup

Gull Bay Road Closeup

Gull Bay Road Closeup

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