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Key First Nation of Saskatchewan


When Treaty 4 was signed between Saulteaux Ojibway's and Canada, in 1874, chief Ow-tah-pe-ka-kaw, agreed to treaty by signing Treaty 4 on September 15, 1874. Below is a satellite image of Key First Nation main town and google earth photos of Badgerville (Mis-sa-ka-kwrij-o-de-na or Badgertown) and Springside (Ta-kiv-on-dass) which are Cote and Keeseekoose towns. 2016's census reported Key First Nation has an on-Reserve population of 143. Including Cote and Keeseekoose, their on-Reserve population is 1,382. They have 58 dwellings with 46 lived in. Average household size is 3.1 persons per household. Ojibway Language is no longer spoken at Key First Nation. In history, these Saulteaux Ojibway's of Key, originally came from Shoal River and Lake Winnipegosis region in Manitoba, to live at Keeseekoose First Nation in Saskatchewan. All three were originally one Reserve. Their original territory included land around Lake Cedar and also Lake Winnipegosis's north shores, down to Swan River Valley (location of old Swan River Reserve), into Saskatchewan, where Keeseekoose Ojibway's now live. They are from Grand Rapids Ojibway's in Manitoba. They were possibly forced out of Swan River Valley by Canada. It has an abundance of farm land. Their descendants in Manitoba, continue to live at Sapotaweyak and Wuskwi Sipihk and Chemawawin and, of course, Grand Rapids or Misipawistik. Read Treaty 5 text.



Key Satellite Image

Badgerville Satellite Image

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Springside Satellite Image

Springside From Road

Springside From Road

Springside From Road

Springside From Road

Springside From Road

Springside From Road

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