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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Red Rock First Nation



This community of Ojibway Indians live along the northern shores of Lake Superior. They are a part of Lake Nipigon Band of Saulteaux Ojibwa's. They are woodlands Saulteaux Ojibwa's. Below are google earth photos of Red Rock. Their land has a rocky soil, countless lakes and is a bit hilly or mountainous. Their communities are located along the southeast shores of Lake Helen (principle one) which is another name they are known by, and over 3 miles to the northwest of Lake Helen is Red Rock. Few people live at Red Rock. Population of Red Rock is 285 according to a 2016 estimate. It does not include off-Reserve population. Most Red Rock Ojibwa's live with whites. There are about 100 housing units at Red Rock. Average household size is near 2.9 persons per household. Only about 10 people at Red Rock know any Ojibwa. Ojibwa is not spoken daily. Their tribal history obviously included war with the whites. According to Edinburgh Encyclopedia (it's from 1832), the Ojibwa's migrated east in two groups. One group came up from the southwest, from probably what is now Kansas and Oklahoma. Another group sent their soldiers east from a location in the west which was probably the Alberta, Montana and Wyoming region. It is the second group that migrated east soon after the southern group commenced their east migration, that Red Rock Ojibwa's are from. White historians refer to these two Ojibwa groups as the Northern Arapaho and Southern Arapaho and Northern Cheyenne and Southern Cheyenne. They are better known as the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's. Another name they are known by is Wichita including the Kit-chi, Ta-wak-o-ni, Ta-o-va-ya and Wa-co. Below is an excerpt from Edinburgh Encyclopedia:



The general tradition of the Lenape is, that their family originally came from the westward, taking possession of the whole country from the Missouri to the sea, and destroying the original inhabitants, whom they name Allegewi. In this migration and contest, which continued for many years, they say that the Iroquois moved in a parallel line with them, but in a more northerly course and finally settled on the St. Lawrence.



Now, you may think it was the Iroquois who forced their way east from that westerly location but your wrong. White explorers visited the St. Lawrence River in the early 16th century and found non Algonquians living there. When the whites returned in the very early 17th century, they found Algonquians living along the St. Lawrence River, in what is now Quebec and New York State. Ojibway leaders followed prophecy and soon after learning the evil people mentioned in the Seven Fires Prophecy had invaded, they sent their soldiers and their familes east to fight the white invaders. It was the Leni Lenape who first reached the east coast. Thus, they are considered by Ojibwa's as grandfathers. Soon after the Leni Lenape eastern migration, large numbers of Ojibwa's from the Alberta and Montana region reached the St. Lawrence River. That happened sometime during the mid 16th century.





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