Anishinabe
History


Rocky Boy Tribe
of
Chippewa Indians of
Montana








Swan Lake First Nation


This Saulteaux Ojibway First Nation is a part of the Kinistin Band of Ojibwa's. In fact, Swan Lake is the home of chief Yellow Quill. Below are several google earth photos of Swan Lake Reserve. It was chief Yellow Quill who took action during the 1860s, when the whites forced their way to what is now Manitoba. That happened after the 1862 Minnesota Indian War in which Ojibwa soldiers attacked that part of Red River Colony, located in what is now Minnesota and North Dakota. Chief Yellow Quill stationed many Ojibwa soldiers at Portage la Prairie to prevent any whites, Eskimos and mixed bloods, from expanding west. He did so to prepare for a fair treaty. Those treaty negotiations were conducted during the late 1860s. It became formal on August 3, 1871 and August 21, 1871, when Treaties 1 and 2 became official. Treaty 2 was an adhesion to Treaty 1. All numbered treaties are adhesions to Treaty 1. In 1875, treaty adhesions were signed in response to white lies. That treaty is known as Treaty 4. Chief Yellow Quill was an important Ojibway leader during those times. He along with his sub-chiefs including chief Kinistin, acted on behalf of the Saulteaux Ojibwa's. Chief Kinistin led many Ojibwa's north to the caribou lands of the Chipewyan. Chief Yellow Quill may have been from northwestern Ontario or where the Ojibway Wa-ba-seem-ong First Nation is located. Their main community is located along Swan Lakes shores. Chief Yellowquill was probably from Swan Lake in northwestern Ontario and not either Swan Lake located in Manitoba.



Population of Swan Lake 7 according to 2011 census, is 371. There are 134 housing units at Swan Lake C. Average household size is around 2.7 persons per household at Swan Lake C. Swan Lake 65C has a population of 49 according to the 2011 census. There are 11 housing units at Swan Lake 65C. Average household size at Swan Lake 65C is around 4.9 persons per household. Total population is 420. That does not include off-Reserve population. They have no organized settlements at Swan Lake. All housing units which number 134, are located along roads within the Reserve. Ojibwa is yet spoken at Swan Lake yet not widely. Around 135 or so people at Swan Lake, have some knowledge of Ojibwa. However, Swan Lakes population has declined while it's number of Ojibway speakers increased. It signifies they are learning Ojibway rather than born speaking Ojibway, at Swan Lake.



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