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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Battle for Matamoros


In early 1846, white leaders of the Empire of England and the many other white nations allied with them, decided to invade Mexico. They knew large numbers of Anishinabe people, and their Indian and black allies, had fled down to the north of Mexico and actually controlled most of Mexico. White leaders were obviously confident they could easily and quickly win the war because of the Revolver. On April 25, 1846, the hostile whites initiated the war for control of Mexico by illegally sending their soldiers to a location very near Matamoros.



April 25-26, 1846 Thornton Affair

On April 25, 1846, a force of American soldiers illegally approached Matamoros, Mexico. Their intentions were to deliberately start a war with Anishinabe controlled Mexico. This battle was fought around 20 miles north of Matamoros (Brownsville, Texas which borders Matamoros) and lasted two days. American soldiers numbered 70 at the battle but many more were camped nearby. Anishinabe soldiers numbered 2,000 and were probably armed with primarily bows and arrows and the few old musket guns they owned. The battle was a two day battle in which the far more numerous Anishinabe soldiers won. White casualties were 16 killed, 5 wounded, and 49 captured. This was the first battle of the so called Mexican-American War.



May 3-9 Siege of Fort Texas

Once the news of the battle historians refer to as the Thornton Affair, reached the government of the Untied States then England, the whites had their excuse for declaring war on the innocent Indians. On March 27, 1846, the whites conspiring to invade Anishinabe controlled Mexico, commenced their march to the Matamoros, Mexico region. They had already reached the Matamoros (Brownsville, Texas), Mexico region just before the April 25-26, 1846 Thornton Affair. They were led there by General Zachary Taylor who ordered the 70 American soldiers to deliberately start the battle known as the Thornton Affair, with the Anishinabe soldiers on April 25, 1846, in order to have an excuse to declare war on Anishinabe controlled Mexico. After the Thornton Affair, the white soldiers who probably numbered several thousand, were ordered to commence to building a fort in the Matamoros region. They eventually named it Fort Texas. Soon after, a force of 5,700 brave Anishinabe soldiers were ordered to attack the American fort still in the construction process. They did on May 3, 1846. Since the whites had the revolver, they knew the fort would survive even knowing the Anishinabe Army attacking the fort, numbered nearly 6,000. The siege lasted until May 9, 1846, when Anishinabe commanders ordered their brave soldiers to lift the siege. Anishinabe casualties were 2 killed and 2 wounded. White casualties were 2 killed and 10 wounded.



May 8, 1846 Battle of Palo Alto

Just before Anishinabe military commanders lifted the siege at Fort Texas, a major battle was fought on May 8, 1846, near Fort Texas, in the Matamoros region. On May 8, 1846, a force of over 2,400 American soldiers, left Fort Texas to battle a force of 3,400 brave Anishinabe soldiers. Anishinabe ogimak (leaders) would learn that their white enemy were all armed with revolvers. There was little the brave Anishinabe soldiers could do to dominate the battle. The whites easily won this battle. Anishinabe casualties were 102 killed, 129 wounded, and 26 missing. White casualties tell a story which is titled, the revolver. White casualties were 9 killed, 45 wounded, and 2 missing. Unfortunately, the results of this battle would be repeated over and over, during this war. Anishinabe military commanders would only allow so many of their brave soldiers to be killed or wounded, during this war.



May 9, 1846 Battle of Resaca de la Palma

This battle was fought in the Matamoros region and a part of the battle for control of Matamoros. Gen. Taylor led a force of 1,700 American soldiers to battle a force of 4,000 brave Anishinabe soldiers and easily defeated them. Anishinabe casualties were 154 killed, 205 wounded, and 156 captured. White casualties were 33 killed and 89 wounded. After this battle, Anishinabe military commanders ordered their brave soldiers to lift the siege at Fort Texas. The Americans then brought the Matamoros region under their control. This battle site is in the city limits of present day Brownsville, Texas. Taylor next targeted the Monterey, Mexico region which was under Anishinabe control. Anishinabe ogimak knew they were in trouble.



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