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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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September 4, 1878 Battle of Clark's Fork






This battle was supposedly fought in southern Montana near present day Belfry, Montana, between Ojibway Soldiers and American Soldiers. Battle of Clark's Fork was fought on Crow Reservation which means white historians are covering something up. No different than Custers Last Stand which was also fought on Crow Reservation according to white historians who are being deceitful. Where Battle of Clark's Fork was fought is a mystery. It wasn't fought on Crow Reservation. However, there is another Clark Fork River in Montana. It commences in southwest Montana, about 5 miles northeast of Butte then flows to Lake Pend Oreille in northern Idaho. So Battle of Clark's Fork was possibly fought in southwest Montana, west of Yellowstone National Park. Battle of Clark's Fork was fought on Wednesday September 4, 1878. Battle of Clark's Fork was a part of Mullan Road War. Above is a list of Mullan Road War battles.



Historians claim that Battle of Clark's Fork was a part of 1878s Bannock-Paiute War but it was just an extension of an Anishinabe exodus that occurred in 1877. This battle was not fought near where present day Belfry, Montana. We don't know where it was actually fought. According to historians, a force of American Soldiers led by Lieutenant William P. Clark, attacked an Anishinabe camp near 10,789 feet Index Peak, Wyoming (it is less than 5 miles from Montana or Crow Reservation) on Thursday August 29, 1878 and fighting continued on next day. Crow Reservation was only a couple of miles away during those times. All around that region are very tall mountains. Ojibway People would have had to follow a road (todays Highway 212 or Beartooth Highway) southeast then northeast to Clark, Wyoming then near to Belfry, Montana. A trek that would have taken considerable time. Another road leads directly east yet elevations reach over 10,000 feet. Distance was around 40 or so miles between Index Peak and Belfry. I'm not certain what transpired. Reason is Crow Reservation. Something is not right. After Clark's soldiers attacked that Ojibway camp, another force of American Soldiers led by Gen. Miles, attacked another Ojibway camp on Crow Reservation which don't make sense. American soldiers led by Gen. Nelson Miles, attacked that Anishinabe camp near present day Belfry, Montana on Wednesday September 4, 1878. They supposedly killed 11 Ojibways and wounded an unknown number and captured 31. White casulaties were 3 killed and 1 wounded. An Anishinabe exodus was still in progress at this time. Many were relocating to Yellowstone National Park, from southwestern Montana.



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