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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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The Battle of Prairie du Chien July 17-20, 1814


This battle was fought near where present day Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin is situated. It was Anishinabe land and the whites were just commencing their invasion there. In early 1814, the whites commenced to send white soldiers and settlers to the Prairie du Chien region, and their actions ignited the battle that was fought there on July 17-20, 1814. From the St. Louis, Missouri region (many Anishinabek were living throughout Missouri at that time), the governor of the Missouri territory ordered a force of over 200 white soldiers to march towards the Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin region, to prevent any further cooperation materializing between the Anishinabek of the southern Wisconsin region and the Missouri region. They intended on building a fortification in the Prairie du Chien region, and that is what they commenced to do after they reached the Prairie du Chien, by sailing the Mississippi river.





From their scouts, Anishinabe military commanders learned about the force of invading white soldiers who had just completed building a fort, and then ordered several hundred of their brave soldiers to march to the region where the fort had just been built. In the battle that was fought starting on July 17, 1817, the Anishinabek first attempted to negotiate with the invading white military force by demanding that the white soldiers immediately leave the fortification and leave their domain. The commander of the invading white military force, Joseph Perkins, refused to obey the laws of the Anishinabek. Soon after the whites refused to obey Anishinabe law, Anishinabe military commanders ordered their brave soldiers to launch an assault on the invading white military force hiding within the protection of the fort. For the next three days a heated battle followed in which the invading white military force continued to defy Anishinabe commands to leave their domain. On July 20, 1814, the white soldiers in the fort were running low on ammunition and the well they had earlier dug up had gone dry. As a result of their predicament the white soldiers agreed to surrender to the enraged Anishinabek who had to put forth great efforts to attempt to remove them from their domain. After surrendering to the enraged Anishinabek, the Anishinabek took control of the fort and either killed the 200 or so white soldiers or enslaved them.



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The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




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