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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Battle of the Neches


This is yet another attempt by white historians to glorify their Cherokee allies who lived in North Carolina in 1839, or at the time of the Battle of the Neches, which was fought on July 15-16, 1839, near what is now Tyler, Texas, which is located in northeastern Texas. As mentioned, by this time large numbers of Anishinabe people (Black River and Swan Creek Chippewa's) from the south of Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio had reached the Kansas and Oklahoma region, then the north of Texas, where they joined with the Anishinabe people already long established throughout what is now Texas. They either planned to attempt to drive the whites out of Texas as historical records indicate, or it was the whites who were bent on indulging in greed again. The whites had the revolver by then and used it against the Anishinabe people still living in eastern Texas. According to historical records, the Anishinabe people of eastern Texas were civilized and lived in quite a few villages scattered about east Texas.



Knowing they now had a weapon they knew could cause massive destruction within the matter of a few minutes, white leaders of Texas instigated this war white historians refer to as the 1839 Cherokee War. No Cherokee fought in this war. Using the fabricated Cordova Rebellion as an excuse, white leaders initiated trouble with the Anishinabe people living in the east of Texas. Their goal was to quickly drive the Anishinabe people out of the east of Texas before the huge number of Anishinabe people who recently fled from the south of Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio could fully merge with the Anishinabe people of Texas and the north of Mexico. Supposedly the second President of Texas Mirabeau B. Lamar (the worse kind of cowardly criminal), stated that Indians and whites could not live on the same land together because nature forbid it. Just another cowardly white excuse. Lamar wanted the Anishinabe people out of east Texas. Lamar ordered 500 white soldiers under the command of Gen. Kelsey Douglass, to commence to attacking the Anishinabe people of east Texas.



Anishinabe soldiers were at a disadvantage because the crooked whites had the revolver. On July 12, the 500 white soldiers led by Douglass, made an attempt to request from the Anishinabe people that they leave east Texas peacefully. Quite a joke but Anishinabe ogimak took it seriously because they knew of, and feared, the revolver. The revolver allowed the whites to dominate battles fought against the mighty Native American, while before the time of the revolver, the mighty Native American almost always dominated the white soldiers. Anishinabe ogimak initially agreed to peacefully leave but feared the inclusion in the agreement that they be escorted out of east Texas by white soldiers. Knowing they had the revolver, the 500 white soldiers refused to wait for the Anishinabe people of east Texas to make their decision, then decided to attack them but Anishinabe soldiers learned of their true intentions before they could do so. The whites all along planned to massacre as many of the innocent Indians as they could. One group of the white soldiers was ordered to advance up Battle Creek, to cut off any attempts by the Anishinabe people in the village to escape, and prevent reinforcements from reaching them. Anishinabe scouts knew what the whites were up to and their commanders ordered their brave soldiers to prepare to defend their women and children from the whites soldiers who would kill them if they had the opportunity.



Anishinabe commanders ordered their brave soldiers to attack the white military force because they knew the white military force was there to kill as many of them as they could. After the initial Anishinabe attack, the white soldiers drove the Anishinabe soldiers back then they retreated into a ravine. From the ravine, the Anishinabe soldiers found an openning which allowed them to get their women and children out of there. They commenced to flee with the white soldiers following them. This first assault occurred on July 15, 1839. At least 3 whites soldiers were killed and 5 more were wounded. Anishinabe casualties were 8 killed and wounded. The next day, the main battle was fought. The white soldiers caught up to the fleeing Anishinabe people in what is now Van Zandt County, Texas. The white soldiers had been reinforced. However, even with new reinforcements, the white military force did not intimdate the Anishinabe soldiers from not first starting the battle. The white soldiers with their revolvers, charged the Anishinabe people over an open field, then they continued their pursuit. The white military force could not force the Anishinabe soldiers to surrender to them. However, they won the battle. Anishinabe casualties on the second day of this long battle was estimated at over 100 killed and an unknown number wounded. White casualties on the second day of this battle were 5 killed and 24 wounded. According to historians, the Anishinabe people of east Texas were forced to relocate to Oklahoma. That is not true for the Anishinabe people who participated in this battle. They reached their kinfolk in central and west Texas.



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