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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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The Battle of Wahoo Swamp November 21, 1836


This battle was fought where present day Sumter County, Florida is located. A force of over 2,500 white soldiers and their Creek allies, under the command of General Richard K. Call, marched into Wahoo Swamp where scores of brave soldiers from the Southern Anishinabe Confederation were probably waiting for them. During the early part of the battle the white soldiers and their Creek allies, gradually forced the soldiers from the Southern Anishinabe Confederation, to set up a diversion in order to get their women and children across a stream. Hot on their trail, the white soldiers and their Creek allies, reached the stream but hesitated crossing the stream, then changed their plans after the soldiers from the Southern Anishinabe Confederation, launched a fierce assault on them. They withdrew from the battle because of the difficult terrain and because their supplies, especially ammunition, had almost been depleted. The Southern Anishinabe Confederation were victorious. After this battle, the United States increased the number of white soldiers in Florida to over 9,000. They also sent their naval fleets to patrol the coastlines of Florida, to prevent the Anishinabek from the Caribbean Islands and Mexico (that includes Texas), from supporting their fellow Anishinabek in Florida, and to stop any Indians from Florida, attempting to flee to the nearby Caribbean Islands.



By January of 1837, several high ranking Indian leaders commenced negotiations with the whites which led to them surrendering. They were located mainly in central and northern Florida. Those Indian leaders agreed to relocate to Oklahoma with their black allies. By May of 1837, those Indian leaders who surrendered, had forced their own people to Fort Brooke to await relocating to Oklahoma. However, scores of soldiers from the Southern Anishinabe Confederation still holding out in central and southern Florida, forced their way into the Fort Brooke region on June 2, 1837, and recaptured the 700 or so Indians who were waiting to be relocated to Oklahoma. Those 700 Indians were possibly sent to the Caribbean Islands. After the recapture of the 700 Indians, the United States gradually sent their soldiers further down to southern Florida, which they had intended to do all along.



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The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




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