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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Battle of Loon Lake


This was the last battle of the 1885 Northwest Rebellion. A force of 47 white soldiers led by Major Sam Steele, met and battled the Anishinabe soldiers under ogima Big Bears leadership, on June 3, 1885, and defeated them. Ogima Big Bears soldiers had with them a large number of white and mixed blood captives, which they wisely used in this battle. By the time of this battle, the Anishinabe soldiers were practically without weapons which ogima Big Bear and the other Anishinabe ogimak (leaders), were very aware of. After learning of the approach of the 47 white soldiers, the 150 Anishinabe soldiers prepared for the coming battle, and actually fared well against the smaller but better armed white military force. After a short battle, the Anishinabek realized they could not defeat the better armed whites, then freed their white and mixed blood captives, then fled up north. This battle occurred just north of the previous battle at Frenchman's Butte, in extreme western Saskatchewan. Anishinabe casualties were from 5 to 12 killed. White casualties were 7 wounded. After the end of this 1885 conflict, large numbers of Anishinabe people commenced an exodus towards the north, into northern Alberta, northern Saskatchewan, northern British Columbia, and into what are now the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and the Yukon.



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The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




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