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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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June 27, 1874 Second Battle of Adobe Walls


They do sure love the descriptions of this battle. Why? A force of only 28 Buffalo Hunters (black American soldiers) fought a force of over 700 brave Anishinabe soldiers and supposedly defeated them. You must remember that the 28 Buffalo Hunters were hiding behind the walls of a fortified settlement before you accept the historical records of this battle. Adobe Walls, Texas was abandoned by the whites after the First Battle of Adobe Walls was fought in 1864. Adobe Walls was located in the northern part of the Texas panhandle and was resettled years after the whites abandoned it. At the time of this 1874 battle, the Texas panhandle was still Anishinabe land. That means the Anishinabe military was still sending their brave soldiers out to defend that region and a road, in order to allow for more Anishinabe people and other Indians, to migrate to northern Mexico. On June 27, 1874, probably as a result of the black American soldiers deliberately killing the buffalo and other wild game which roamed their land and stirring up trouble with them, some 700 or more brave Anishinabe soldiers launched an assault on the fotified settlement of Adobe Walls, Texas.



Their first assault ended in failure and resulted in the Anishinabe military commanders ordering their brave soldiers to lay siege to the fortified settlement. It would last for 4 days. Anishinabe commanders would not allow their brave soldiers to fight in the open. The American soldiers had superior weapons and were behind fortified walls. After the 4th day of this siege, Anishinabe commanders got the message. They were not going to fight an enemy which dared not leave their fortified settlement. If the Buffalo Killers had actually left the safety of their fortification and had been captured, they would have been killed in the most gruesome manners imaginable. That kept them inside their fort. Anishinabe military commanders ordered their brave soldiers to end the siege then to commence going back to their homes in victory. Anishinabe casualties were 15 killed and an unknown number wounded. American casualties were 4 killed and an unknown number wounded. An unusually high casualty count considering that the American soldiers were hiding behind fortified walls. This battle was the first in the Red River War.



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