Algonquian Tribes | Communities | First Nations | Ojibway Indians History | Reservations | Tribes




Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


Click Here To Donate




The April 15, 1873 Second Battle of the Stronghold


Just before the Second Battle of the Stronghold, the Americans attempted to negotiate a peace with Anishinabe ogimak. Still fresh in their minds was the treachery the Americans used in 1852, while pretending to want to negotiate for a peace, but instead the American soldiers massacred 41 Anishinabe people. Captain Jack was forced by other Anishinabe ogimak to conspire to do the same to the American representatives who wanted to hold a peace negotiation with them. During some point during the negotiation for a peace, Captain Jack pulled out his supposed revolver and shot and killed General Canby. Another shot killed Reverend Thomas. Another American representative was shot but lived. Two others managed to escape probably because the Anishinabek wished them no harm.



On April 15, 1873, the American soldiers advanced upon the Anishinabe stronghold. Their goal was to cut off the route Anishinabe people were using to get drinking water from Tule Lake. The American soldiers were successful at doing that. The Second Battle of the Stronghold lasted between April 15-17, and led to 7 Americans being killed and another 13 being wounded. Anishinabe casualties were 2 boys killed after they attempted to open a bomb with an axe, but it exploded instead.





Free Book


The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




Contact


2009-2017 Anishinabe-History.Com