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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Steamboat Chippewa


On July 11, 1861, an event occurred where Milk River's mouth is. It's 6.8 miles northeast of Fort Peck, Montana. This battle was a part of Mullan Road War. A list of Mullan Road War battles is below. Through a treaty agreement, whites were allowed by Anishinabe leaders to use Missouri River to bring trade items by steamboat to Fort Benton trade post. First steamboat to reach Fort Benton trade post was named Chippewa and that was followed by one named Key West. That occurred in 1860. Alarmed Anishinabe ogimak became very concerned once they learned large numbers of illegal white settlers were arriving by steamboat to Fort Benton trade post. Historians claim that over 20,000 illegal white settlers used Mullan Road to travel from Fort Benton trade post and from Fort Walla Walla, Washington, westwards and eastwards, to Montana. It set off a war for control of Montana. That may have occurred in 1860 or 1861. On July 11, 1861, steamboat Chippewa exploded east of Fort Benton trade post. Specifically where Milk River's mouth is. Historians claim that a fire accidentally erupted on steamboat Chippewa which was carrying a large supply of gun powder. That gun powder was not going to be traded to Indians. It was going to be used by whites who were making themselves clear to Anishinabek, that they were troublemakers.



Supposedly after learning their steamboat was on fire, whites quickly evacuated their steamboat then set it loose to sail down river where it eventually exploded. According to historians, a force of Crow Indians showed up next day and joined whites to scavenge for any usuable items left after that explosion. Then whites supposedly left to travel to Fort Union and a large force of Lakota soldiers then showed up to battle Crow Soldiers. It is all complete nonsense. We are not stupid! White historians are covering up an event that occurred. Most likely, Ojibway Soldiers attacked steamboat Chippewa and either captured or killed white passengers on steamboat Chippewa, then looted it for supplies it carried. They then destroyed it. After accomplishing their assignment, they may have released most or all white captives they held. That is probably when they returned to Fort Union (Fort Buford, North Dakota) and notified their authorities about their ordeal. A battle was obviously fought (white historians claim it was Indian against Indian) in which many casualties were inflicted. We just don't know how many casualties occurred. Some of those 19th century steamboats could carry 100s of passengers. That means 100s of casualties possibly occurred. Indian casualties were probably higher because whites had superior weapons yet Ojibway Soldiers won this little known battle.



Battles of Mullan Road War

Steam Boat Chippewa Fiasco

Battle of Big Mound

Battle of Dead Buffalo Lake

Battle of Stoney Lake

Battle of White Stone Hill

Battle of Killdeer Mountain

Fisk's Expedition

Battle of Red Buttes

Battle of Deer Creek Station

Battle of Dry Creek

Custard Wagon Train Fight

Platte Bridge Battle

Battle of Bone Pile Creek

Battle at Platte Bridge Station

Battle of Fort Rice

Battle of the Tongue River

1865 Powder River Expedition

Sun River Stampede

Battle of Crazy Woman Creek

Battle of Peno Creek

Fetterman Massacre

Fort Buford Massacre

Haystack Battle

Battle of Fort Kearny

Battle Near Fort Ellis

Battle of Popo Aguie

Battle of Miner's Delight

Pryor's Fork Battle (1872 Yellowstone Expedition)

Second Battle of Tongue River (1873 Yellowstone Expedition)

Battle of Bighorn (1873 Yellowstone Expedition)

Battle of Powder River

Battle of the Rosebud

1874 Black Heels (Blackfeet) Expedition (Custers Last Stand)

Battle of Snake Mountain

Battle of Slim Buttes

Battle of Cedar Creek

Battle of Bates Creek

Battle of Ash Creek

Battle of Wolf Mountain

Marias River Massacre

Battle of Lame Deer

Battle of White Bird Canyon

Battle of the Cottonwoods

Battle of the Clearwater

Battle of Weippe Prairie

Battle of Big Hole

Battle of Horse Prairie

Battle of Birch Creek, Idaho

Battle of Camas Creek

Battle of Canyon Creek

Battle of Cow Island

Battle of Cow Creek

Battle of Bear Paw

Battle of South Mountain

Battle of Silver River

Battle of Birch Creek

Battle of Clearwater River

Battle of Clark's Fork

Battle of Heart Mountain

Massacre Near Yellowstone Lake

Battle of Jackson Hole

Battle of Careless Creek

Battle of Big Creek

Battle of Milk River

Battle of Pumpkin Creek

Battle of Poplar River

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The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




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