Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana








The Third Battle of New York October 28, 1776


Still clinging on to the hopes of defeating the English of the New York City region, the mighty Anishinabek in October of 1776, were still yet fighting the invading English for control of that region which was originally a white Dutch colony over 100 years earlier. Involved in this battle was over 6,000 English soldiers (that includes English American soldiers under George Washington’s command), and several thousand Anishinabe soldiers. After learning that their English enemy (Germans were also a part of the large English military force who acted on their own) was advancing towards them, the Anishinabe soldiers assembled around Chatterton Hill to await the coming assault from the English and Germans. It was a German Regiment which first attacked the crest of the hill, which resulted in a large number of Anishinabe soldiers retreating, but at another nearby location the German Lossberg Regiment was driven back after the Anishinabe soldiers commenced to defend themselves, from their assault. After the first two assaults, a large group of English soldiers attempted to reinforce the German Lossberg Regiment, but they were also driven off by the Anishinabe soldiers. They needed only to defeat the Anishinabe soldiers fighting the German Lossberg Regiment to end the battle, and that occurred after the English reassembled then assaulted again, after their first assault failed. In the English victory, 70 English and German soldiers were killed, while another 308 were wounded in the fierce battle. I have no idea what the Indian casualties were, but since they lost they obviously endured more casualties. Though the Anishinabek had lost the battle, they were still yet on the offensive in the New York City region. They were concentrating on the New York City region because of its strategic importance to the invading whites. The number of Anishinabe soldiers who participated in the New York City campaign may have been as large as 20,000. After the war first erupted, 100,000s of English whites fled to the New York City region to seek safety from the brave Anishinabe soldiers who first assaulted the many smaller isolated white settlements to the west and north of the New York City region.



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