Bad River Reservation


Located in far northern Wisconsin, adjacent to Lake Superior, is Bad River Reservation. Below is a map of Bad River Reservation and links to google earth photos of Old Odanah. It is more than 90% wilderness. In Ojibway, it's named Mashkiiziibi yet that is suppose to mean Bad River. It don't. It means Marsh River. Their word for "bad" is "Maad-ji." Notice how whites combine Ojibway words? It's correct name is "Ma-ji Sip-pi Ish-kon-i-gan," which means Bar River Reservation in Ojibway. A very small part of BRR is located on Madeline Island. Their population has increased little since 1900. Their Reservation population according to 2010's census, is 1,411. Many of them are non Indian. Whites number 282, while Ojibway's number 1,096. Around 1900, Bad River Reservation had a population of around 1,000. Their somewhat in a stall. We expect their population to increase very slowly. It was in 1854 when Ojibway leaders signed La Pointe Treaty which established Bad River Reservation and nearly all other Wisconsin Chippewa Reservations. However, a couple of years before 1854's La Pointe Treaty, Ojibway leaders ordered many of their people to pack their belongings to prepare for a diaspora west. It was Seven Fires Prophecy which led them to commence their exodus. They left at a wrong time.



This diaspora is known historically as Sandy Lake Tragedy. Several hundred Ojibway's died on their migration. However, Ojibway People must not believe what whites have written about their history. Again i will mention Seven Fires Prophecy. Though a great many Ojibway people did go west, many continued to live in Wisconsin. And those Ojibway's who were captured by whites, were eventually forced back to their Wisconsin homes. Most reached Montana and further west.



A Reservation of 194.2 sq. mi. or 503.1 sq. km. was set aside for Ojibway's of Bad River. However, after 1887's illegal Dawes Act was utilized by American leaders, much of Bad River Reservation (55,408 acres) was lost to whites. However, that is misleading because this Reservation is nearly all wilderness. Thus, a reason for their 19th century exodus. They knew not to trust whites. However, land which covers this Reservation is not ideal for agriculture operations. As mentioned earlier, nearly 100% of Bad River Reservation is a wilderness. Of course, that means it is really an off limits Reservation. Most whites live along southern shores of Lake Superior. Nearly all Ojibway communities are located along U.S. Route 2. They include Birch Hill which is located along Reservation Highway 5 and on their domain's eastern border. Birch is located 1.5 miles northwest of Birch Hill. Franks Field is over a mile northwest of Birch. New Odanah is 4 miles northwest of Franks Field. It's capital of Maji Sippi Ishkonigan. Odanah is located 2 miles northwest of New Odanah. Old Odanah is located a half a mile west of Odanah, along Caville Road. There are no Ojibway communities located along southern shores of Lake Superior as of yet. Only a small area east of Marengo has farms. All remaining land is wilderness. There are locations in BRR's northwest where unorganized settlements are located. They number about 5. On BRR's map below, they are indicated with a UO. They are located along Old Odanah Road, Johnson Road, Reykdal Road, Kagerville Road and Goslin Road. There are no settlements in BRR's south.



An interesting bit of information to mention about this Reservation, is Ojibway leaders of Bad River Reservation, have allowed Yamassee Seminole's to purchase 40 acres of Reservation land and set up Oklevueha Colony. This colony claims they are still at war with United States and are not American citizens. Seminole's and all other Muskogean Indians, are partly Ojibway or Ojibway. BRR's leaders will not allow any Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians near their Reservation.



Old Odanah Road View

Old Odanah Road View

Old Odanah Road View

Old Odanah Road View

Old Odanah Road View

Old Odanah Road View



Free Book


The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




Contact


Copyright 2009-2020 Anishinabe-History.Com