Eagle Hills Indian Reserve of Saskatchewan


This Reserves location is 24 km or 15 miles, south of North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Below is a map of Eagle Hills Reserve and links to google earth photos of their scenic land. There are four distinct Reserves which make up Eagle Hills Indian Reserve. They are Grizzly Bears Head, Lean Man or Kawacatoose, Mosquito and Red Pheasant. Though they claim Grizzly Bears Head, Lean Man and Mosquito are a same Reserve, if Red Pheasant Reserve is connected to them, than why don't they classify it as a part of Grizzly Bears Head, Lean Man and Mosquito Reserve? Probably because of chiefs Red Pheasant and Wuttunee! They are from Jackfish Lake Saulteaux Ojibway's. Eagle Hills Reserve covers 104,001 acres or 162.2 sq. mi. or 42,119 hectares or 421.2 sq. km. 2016's on-Reserve population of Eagle Hills Indian Reservation is 1,064. Their having problems keeping their citizens within their Reserve. We know this Reserve is an Ojibway Reserve. Chief Wuttunee and chief Red Pheasant, were brothers and also Ojibway. Their related to chiefs Okanese, Keeseekoowenin and other Ojibway leaders through Cuthbert Grant. Chief Rocky Boy was also related to Cuthbert Grant. This Reserve is one of chief Rocky Boy's many Reservations and Reserves. A land surrender in 1905, was for chief Rocky Boy's Montana Ojibway's. It was not for whites. In 1876, chief Rocky Boy along with chief Big Bear and chief Sitting Bull, fled to Alberta's and Saskatchewan's Cypress Hills. Canada sent negotiators to Saskatchewan to negotiate with these Montana Ojibway's who fled to Canada. They did this by preparing Treaty 6 which was for those Montana Ojibway's that fled to Canada. They, excluding chief Sitting Bull, agreed to relocate 100's of miles north to near Fort Pitt, Saskatchewan or north of North Saskatchewan River, where a vast Ojibway Reserve from North Saskatchewan Rivers mouth, to Saddle Lake, Alberta was set aside per treaty agreements. They excluded Alberta's oil sands. All land north of Saskatchewan River and North Saskatchewan River, to Beaufort Sea, became their Reserve. In 1882, Canada broke treaty and reduced their vast Reserve to a region between Prince Albert, Saskatchewan and Saddle Lake, Alberta. It extended from North Saskatchewan River north to Clearwater River then northeast to Cree Lake. In 1885, Canada broke treaty again. This time chief Big Bear and other Ojibway leaders, refused to cede land. Many citizens of Eagle Hills Reservation, can trace their roots back to Montana. After 1876-1877's War in Montana, 10,000s of Saulteaux Ojibway's from Montana, fled up to Cypress Hills of Alberta and Saskatchewan and were probably set aside a large Cypress Hills Reserve but Canada refused to honor treaty. They forced these Saulteaux Ojibway's living at Cypress Hills Reservation, to relocate to southeastern Saskatchewan where Crooked Lakes Reserve, File Hills Reserve and Qu'Appelle Lakes Reserve are located. Those Saulteaux Ojibway's who refused to relocate to southeast Saskatchewan, migrated to near where Fort Battleford is and further north. They were led by chief Big Bear. Eagle Hills Indian Reserve is a land heavily covered by a unique Saskatchewan forest and has many lakes.



Eagle Hills Reserve Road View

Eagle Hills Reserve Road View

Eagle Hills Reserve Road View

Eagle Hills Reserve Road View

Eagle Hills Reserve Road View

Eagle Hills Reserve Road View

Eagle Hills Reserve Road View

Eagle Hills Reserve Road View





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