Fond du Lac Reservation


On September 30, 1854, Ojibway leaders in Montana agreed to a land cession in northern Minnesota. Below are maps of Fond Du Lac Reservation (it's also known as St. Louis River Indian Reservation) that will surprise you and links to google earth photos of Mahnomen. Per treaty agreements, Fond Du Lac Reservation was created for an Ojibway People of this area in Minnesota named "Nagaajiwanaang." In Ojibway, Na-gad-jiw-an means "Water is Hindered or Stops." It refers to Grand Portage of St. Louis River or to a location or not a people. Ojibway Language Locatives are unique. They are placed at ends of words describing a particular location. Thus, this "Na'gad'jiw'an'aag" means "Water Stops Place." Their "aag as in ug or jus ag" represents "stick," as in a stick is used to mark a location. An example is "Wam-pa-no-ag." You probably recognize "Wam-pa-no-ag" as being an Indian Tribe in Massachusetts. That isn't so. Wam-pa-no-ag means "Conjure Stick" in Ojibway. Ojibway word for "Conjure, Magic, Sorcery and Witchcraft" is "Wa-ba-no." It's not "Wa-ba-no-wi-win." Their word for "Conjurer, Magician, Sorcerer and Witch is "Wa-ba-note." Adding their word for stick makes it "Wa-ba-no-ag." Massachusetts People are Ojibway. Descriptions of Fond Du Lac Reservation boundaries were described this way: Beginning at an Island in St. Louis River above Knife Portage (just north of Cloquet or adjacent to Cloquet's north), named by Ojibway's Paw-paw-sco-me-me-tig; running thence W. to Boundary line heretofore described (a straight line west); thence N. along said boundary line to Savannah River's mouth at St. Louis River; thence down St. Louis River to place of beginning; if said tract contains less than 100,000 acres, a strip sufficient to make this amount shall be added to this Reservations south side. Foud Du Lac Reservation had a land area of around 200 sq. mi. or 518.0 sq. km. or 128,000 acres or 51,799.8 hectares. There was no need to add land to it's south. It was an excuse used by American's to violate Fond Du Lac Reservation or assimiliate Ojibway People from Fond Du Lac Reservation. Today's Fond Du Lac Reservation boundaries are incorrect. None of Cloquet should be within Fond Du Lac Reservation. All Ojibway Villages are located in Fond Du Lac Reservation extreme east. Leaders of this Ojibway Fond Du Lac Reservation must adhere to original Reservation boundaries or honor original treaty agreements. In 1900 or 1907, American leaders opened up Fond Du Lac Reservation to white settlement. However, they may be concealing Montana Ojibway's led by chief Rocky Boy, being relocated to Fond Du Lac Reservation. We need to investigate further. They had no need to open up this Reservation to white settlement. It has little farmland and was covered by wetlands. As a result of American infidelity, we can't determine correct demographics of Fond Du Lac Reservation. Most Ojibway's living at this Reservation, are included with Cloquets population. Population of Fond du Lac Reservation was 4,240 according to 2010's census. Whites make up a majority of this Reservations population. However, Reservation boundaries are incorrect. Remember, American leaders wrote "if said tract contains less than 100,000 acres, a strip sufficient to make this amount shall be added to this Reservations south side. They made no mention of eradicating it's west portion. If you carefully look at 1865's map, you'll notice Reservation boundary makes an abrupt turn southeast and includes what is now Cloquet. Reservations south boundary should extend about 2 miles further south.



Mahnomen Road View

Mahnomen Road View

Mahnomen Road View

Mahnomen Road View

Mahnomen Road View

Mahnomen Road View

Mahnomen Road View

Mahnomen Road View











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