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Donate to our cause! Money donated will be used to create a government for "Our Selected Land" and other private ventures including agriculture, ect. We are the "Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana." We have to follow chief Rocky Boy, if we are to follow prophesy!



Keeseekoose Reservation of Manitoba and Saskatchewan


Originally, these Ojibway's lived in Manitoba. They were set aside a Reserve near Swan River, Manitoba. Below is a map of Keeseekoose Reservation, links to google earth photos of Badgerville and 1897 demographics of Canadian Ojibway Reserves including Keeseekoose, Cote and The Key. According to historians, flooding forced these Ojibway's to relocate to adjacent Saskatchewan. However, Greed for Land was what motivated Canadian leaders to coerce them to relocate. Many refused to relocate and stayed in Manitoba. They are known today as Sapotaweyak and Wuskwi Sipihk Reserves. They are not Cree. They are Ojibway. Cree People are Beaver Indians. There are no Cree First Nations in Manitoba and Saskatchewan. Do your research. Beaver Indians (they include Sekani and T'suu Tina) have 3 Reserves in Alberta and 6 in British Columbia. Ojibway leaders didn't want anything to do with them because they sided with whites. On September 24, 1875 negotiations were held at Swan Lake, Manitoba about signing an adhesion to Treaty 4. Chief The Key and chief Keeseekoose signed treaty. Canada appointed 4 Ojibway leaders to be leaders for life which was illegal. Canada asked them where they wanted their Reserves. In response, chief The Key told them he wanted a Reserve along Swan River near Swan Lake which is 20 miles or 32.3 kilometers northeast of Swan River, Manitoba. Canadian leaders already knew that land in that region was fertile. In 1878, they surveyed for a Reserve and set aside 30,300 acres or 12,262 hectares, for The Key Reserve. After a minor flood in 1880, Canadian leaders used it as an excuse to coerce these Ojibway's to relocate to near Fort Pelly, Saskatchewan. Ojibway leaders did not want land whites wanted. They made that clear to white leaders. What transpired, was Ojibway leaders leaving for heavily wooded ares near Fort Pelly or land south of Swan River, Manitoba and adjacent Saskatchewan. Included as being a part of Keeseekoose Reservation are Cote and The Key. In area, Keeseekoose Reservation covers 380.5 sq. mi. or 985.5 sq. km. Canada forced this Ojibway Reservation to surrender land to chief Rocky Boy's landless Ojibway's. Land surrenders between 1897 and 1911 in Canada, were for chief Rocky Boy's landless Ojibway's. They did not cede land to whites. Canadian historians are liars. Canada forced these Ojibway's to leave heavily wooded areas on their Reserves east, for fertile land further west. Back near Swan Lake, their descendants continue to live at Sapotaweyak and Wuskwi Sipihk. 2016's on-Reserve population of Keeseekoose Reservation is 1,382.



Satellite Image of Badgerville

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road

Badgerville From Road









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