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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Lemhi Reservation


This Anishinabe Idaho Reservation has a very suspicious past. It was supposedly established in 1875 but that is probably another white lie. Something about this event resembles the circumstances surrounding the events which befell the Anishinabe people led by ogima Charlo who lived in the Bitterroot Valley and Big Hole Basin of Montana, which is about 40 miles to the north of the so called Lemhi Reservation. Ogima Charlo refused to leave the Bitterroot Valley and Big Hole Basin. The whites resorted to destroying the crops grown by the Anishinabe people living in the Bitterroot Valley of Montana, to force them to relocate to the Flathead Reservation in October of 1891. Though the Lemhi Valley is not as large as the Bitterroot Valley the whites wanted it. Supposedly the United States set aside a 160 sq. mi. (102,104 acres) Reservation in the Lemhi Valley in 1875. Then in 1907 they had a change of plans. Supposedly the United States demanded that the Anishinabe people of the Lemhi Valley must have their Reservation eradicated and that they must relocate to the Fort Hall Reservation. A complete outright lie.



Either the allotments brought on by the filthy 1887 Dawes Act was the culprit, or the United States had yet to reach a treaty with the Anishinabe people led by ogima Tendoy living in the Lemhi Valley. For all we know the Anishinabe people living in the Lemhi Valley in 1907, had yet to reach any treaty agreement with the United States about the filthy 1887 Dawes Act. Ogima Tendoy died on May 9, 1907, and then the Anishinabe people living there were forced to relocate to the Fort Hall Reservation one month after ogima Tendoy died. Though historians claim that 86 out of 137 adult Lemhi males voted for relocation to Fort Hall in 1905, that is a lie. I strongly suspect that the whites are covering up an event they don't want known of which occurred in the Idaho Lemhi Valley which strongly resembles the October 1891 Anishinabe forced relocation out of the Bitterroot Valley and Big Hole Basin of Montana. The Idaho Lemhi Valley is only a few miles south of the Montana Bitterroot Valley and Big Hole Basin, which means the two events, though years apart, are related.



October 1, 1863 Treaty of Ruby Creek

Of the two treaties mentioned on this page, it is this one which proves that the Lemhi Reservation did not exist. On October 1, 1863, representatives of the Anishinabe Nation, met with American representatives and an agreement was reached in which the United States recognized the boundaries of much of the western Anishinabe Nation. It extended from what is now the southwestern Montana and Idaho border, just south of the Big Hole Basin, all the way to southern Nevada, and much of eastern Oregon, parts of extreme northeastern California, as well as nearly all of western Idaho south of the Idaho panhandle, and also northwestern Utah west of the Great Salt Lake. Why is this treaty special? This treaty was made to establish a Reservation and present day Shoshone ogimak will not accept payments for not selling their land. In other words this treaty is still a legal binding treaty which is being honored by Indian ogimak but not the United States. The United States claims they took possession of this entire land area specified in this treaty known as the October 1, 1863 Treaty of Ruby Creek, without formal Anishinabe consent. That means a cover-up is in place. It is not the only treaty between the Anishinabe Nation and the United States, in which the United States claims they took possession of Anishinabe land without formal Anishinabe consent.



The very next day (October 2, 1863) representatives of the Anishinabe Nation, met with American representatives and an agreement was reached. It is known as the October 2, 1863 Old Crossing Treaty. These two treaties reached one day of each other, clearly proves the both are in fact the same treaty. The United States is still trying to eradicate this October 1, 1863 treaty by trying to coerce Indian ogimak into accepting money for agreeing to eradicate this Reservation. The so called Lemhi Reservation was entirely within this area the United States agreed to set aside for the Anishinabe Nation. That means it was the filthy 1887 Dawes Act which led to the 100s of Anishinabek living in the Lemhi Valley and probably the nearby Big Hole Basin, to pack their belongings and commence an exodus. They either had to do that or the evil United States warned them they would send their soldiers in to forcefully relocate them. The whites made it clear that they could leave on trains but the Anishinabek refused. They used their horses and probably fled westwards, into Nevada and California.



September 24, 1868 Virginia City, Montana Treaty

About the time the 1862-1868 Snake River War and Red Clouds War ended, a treaty agreement was reached on September 24, 1868 between the Anishinabe Nation and the United States. The treaty negotiations were held at Virginia City, Montana and an agreement was reached in which the United States recognized that the Anishinabe Nation owned land from the Yellowstone River to the Idaho Bitterroot Mountains. Supposedly a Reservation was set aside in the Idaho Lemhi Valley but that is not true. The treaty was never ratified by the United States. This September 24, 1868 treaty, is extremely important because it can be used to claim that a relationship existed between the Anishinabe people living in the Lemhi Valley, with the Anishinabe people living in the Bitterroot Valley and Big Hole Basin of Montana, which is about 11 miles (Big Hole Basin) and 42 miles (Bitterroot Valley) away. This September 24, 1868 treaty probably ended the Snake River War. Ogima Little Bear claimed that his father lived in southern Idaho, near the Snake River. Ogima Big Bear was an important Anishinabe military commander stationed in the Idaho region during the Snake River War. Ogima Big Bear and his son ogima Little Bear, were Anishinabe.



In August of 1867, the United States was allowed by friendly tribes (probably Bannacks or the Nez Perce) to construct Fort Ellis which is now Bozeman, Montana. Around the same time (1867) the United States established a trading post about 20 miles west of Great Falls. Historians may claim that Fort Shaw was an American military fort but that is a lie. It was a trading post. The Great Falls, Montana region was too dangerous at the time (1867) to have an American military fort established. However, the Bozeman, Montana region obviously had a population of non Algonquians who formed alliances with the United States. Their descendants now regret what their ancestors did. In 1841, the Salish people who were being subjugated by the Anishinabe people at the time, sent four of their men to meet with white Christian Missionaries in Iowa and also Missouri, to request that they send some of their missionaries to the Bitterroot Valley. They arrived in 1841 and established St. Mary's Mission. It is now Stevensville, Montana. The Salish people now regret what their ancestors did. The white Christian Missionaries did not travel to the Bitterroot Valley to preach Christianity to the Indians. They could care less for Indians. They traveled to the Bitterroot Valley to commence the white settlement of that part of Montana.



In 1841, the Bitterroot Valley was occupied by the Anishinabe people and their subjects who were Bannacks, Kootenai, Nez Perce, and Salish. The same can be said for the other mountain valleys located in southwestern Montana and the Lemhi Valley of Idaho. Supposedly the United States established a military fort at St. Mary's in 1850 but that is probably false unless the Bannacks, Kootenai, Nez Perce, and Salish formed an alliance with the whites. That is probable because the Anishinabe Nation subjugated those tribes and hopefully punished them in the most horrific manners imaginable. They knew what their future foretold. The 1868 treaty probably ended the Snake River War. This September 24, 1868 treaty, probably did not include Anishinabe ogimak but leaders from the Bannacks, Kootenai, Nez Perce, and Salish who were very willing to sign the agreement because, according to ogima Joseph (the famous Chief Joseph) the whites first came to Anishinabe ogimak demanding that they sell their land to them but they refused. Then the whites went to other Indian Nations telling their leaders if they paid them money they would sell Anishinabe land to them. The whites then returned to the Anishinabe ogimak and told them they had just bought their (Anishinabe) land and they had to give it to them. What ogima Joseph described is something you would forbid to be learned of. It makes you want to cry.



Of course, the whites went to leaders of other Indians Nations (the Bannacks, Kootenai, Nez Perce, and Salish) and told them that the United States wanted to sell them Anishinabe land. And, of course, the leaders of the Bannacks, Kootenai, Nez Perce, and Salish were most eager to buy Anishinabe land. They later on got knifed in the back by the evil United States. That land set aside for the Anishinabe people included the Bitterroot Valley, the Big Hole Basin, and the other mountain valleys in southwestern Montana. The United States did not ratify the treaty because they intended on stealing that land. Ogima Tendoy and ogima Charlo, went to their graves refusing to sign any treaty which ceded their land to the evil whites. That means that land is Anishinabe.





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