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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve


In 1836, white representatives met with Anishinabe leaders about Manitoulin Island. Many Chippewa's from Michigan were sailing to the large island during those times to escape from the white threat. The United States was not honoring treaty. In 1836, they refused to abide to the treaty demands of Anishinabe leaders which led to a massive Chippewa Exodus from Illinois, Indiana, southern Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, west into the Missouri region. In northern Michigan, many of the Chippewa's sailed to the islands within Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior. They sought to escape from the evil intentions of the whites. A treaty known as the Bond Head Treaty, was signed between the Anishinabe Nation and England in 1836, in which England recognized Manitoulin Island as being an Anishinabe Reserve.



It is well known even now that the Anishinabe Nation refused to cede their Manitoulin Island Reserve. Subsequent treaties after 1836 which stole most of Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve, are illegal. As mentioned, Anishinabe leaders refused to cede their Manitoulin Island Reserve. Indian leaders who did not have the authority to act on behalf of the Anishinabe Nation, were bought off by the whites in 1862 (the 1862 MacDougall Treaty), to illegally cede the large Indian Reserve. Only Wikwemikong retained an Anishinabe claim to ownership of all of Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve. What followed after 1862, was a drift in attitude between the Anishinabe people of Wikwemikong and those who lived on the west side of Manitoulin Island.



In 1968, the Anishinabek of Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve, Point Grondine, and South Bay agreed to amalgamate then changed the name of Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve, to Wikwemikong Unceded Indian Reserve. They shouldn't have done that. By doing that, they defaced their ancestors determination to retain all of Manitoulin Island as their Reserve. We have not forgotten that all of Manitoulin Island is an Anishinabe Reserve and will remain an Anishinabe Reserve. Cockburn Island is also a part of Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve, as are all the islands in close proximity to Manitoulin Island. An alternate government needs to be created which governs all of Manitoulin Island and retains the name Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve. Below is a list of the communities of the Anishinabe Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve. Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve covers 2,937 sq. km. or 1,134 sq. mi. The Indian population of Manitoulin Island Indian Reserve (living in Indian communities) in 2011, is 4,668.



Aundeck Omni Kaning

Buzwah

Kaboni

M'Chigeeng

Murray Hill

Sheguiandah

Sheshegwaning

South Bay

Two O'Clock

Wabozominissing

Wauwauskinga

Wikwemikong

Wikwemikonsing

Zhiibaahaasing

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The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




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