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Trenton Indian Service Area


Trenton is supposedly a part of the Turtle Mountain Reservation but that is incorrect. An office was established in Trenton for the Chippewa's who were supposedly allotted over 500,000 acres in Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota after the fraudulent 1892 treaty known as the infamous 10 cent an acre Treaty was ratified by the United States in 1904. At the present time, the Trenton Indian Service Area claims the population of the Chippewa's in the Montana and North Dakota Counties within its area (in Montana it covers Sheridan, Roosevelt, and Richland Counties - in North Dakota they are Divide, Williams, and McKenzie Counties) is over 2,600. Another 600 or so other Indians from other tribes are included as well. They be Arikara (they are partially Anishinabe), Assiniboine (they are partially Anishinabe), Hidatsa (they are also partially Anishinabe), and Mandans.



These allotments are really a part of the Chippewa Reservation established sometime after 1892 for those Chippewa's who lived around Fort Peck Reservation, after the illicit eradication of the huge Turtle Mountain Reservation. Ogima Little Shell III and the rest of the government of the Anishinabe Nation, refused to ratify the 1892 treaty which is better known as the McCumber Agreement. I suspect the Chippewa Reservation established after the 1892 10 cent an acre Treaty was signed, was set aside at what was the Fort Buford Military Reservation in Montana and North Dakota. It is the real Turtle Mountain Reservation of Montana and North Dakota. The Turtle Mountain Reservation in Rolette County, North Dakota is not the Turtle Mountain Reservation of Montana and North Dakota. The real Turtle Mountain Reservation of Montana and North Dakota covers 900 sq. mi., or 576,000 acres. And the United States refused to honor the treaty agreements.



Little Shell III Defiance

In 1895, ogima (chief) Little Shell III and other Chippewa leaders including ogima Red Thunder, constructed a fort to prevent the whites from forcing them to relocate to the Turtle Mountain Reservation in Rolette County, North Dakota. News from this event is from a Bismarck Tribune newspaper article from May 10, 1895. The incident happened on May 7, 1895. It could not have happened on the Turtle Mountain Reservation of Rolette County, North Dakota. It was already 13 years old by 1895. It happened in northeastern Montana and was about the infamous 10 cent an acre Treaty. Ogima Little Shell III and the other Chippewa leaders, had constantly requested to have the chance to negotiate with United States representatives about the vast Turtle Mountain Reservation. They refused. On May 7, 1895, a force of white and Indian police surrounded the fort the Chippewa's were in.



Their fort was located on top of a high hill. After the white police approached the fort, they commenced to prepare shallow rifle pits, as if the were expecting a battle to follow. However, after one of the white police officers walked up to the fort, he was told by the Chippewa's they would not negotiate with him but they wanted further time to hear news from Washington D.C. They were obviously expecting some news from Washington but they were played and they knew the United States had no intentions on negotiating. They surrendered to the white police officers who only arrested Chippewa leaders who participated in the siege. Among them was 87 year old ogima Red Thunder who attacked one of the white police officers with his knife. They were taken to Rolla, North Dakota and jailed.



Ogima Little Shell III led a force of 150 Chippewa's to the Turtle Mountain Reservation of Rolette County, North Dakota, to attempt to free the Chippewa leaders who were arrested and jailed. Ogima Little Shell III was met by agent Hall who told him and the other Chippewa's with him, that the Chippewa prisoners had willingly surrendered. The 150 Chippewa's were persuaded by Hall to turn back. It was reported in the May 10, 1895 Bismarck Tribune newspaper article, that ogima Little Shell III was arrested. This may have been the date ogima Little Shell III was forced to relocate to the Turtle Mountain Reservation of Rolette County, North Dakota.



Fort Buford Indian Reservation and the Land Allotments

Later on in 1895, the 900 sq. mi. Fort Buford Military Reservation was shut down. This happened on October 1, 1895, or nearly 6 months after the siege at the Chippewa fort and ogimak Little Shell III, Red Thunder, and the other defiant Chippewa leaders had been arrested. On April 21, 1904, the infamous 10 cent an acre Treaty or the McCumber Agreement, was ratified by the United States. Afterwards, it caused all kinds of problems for ogima Rocky Boy who assumed the role of the principle leader of the Chippewa's. It was reported that 390 Chippewa families moved to the Trenton area which is the Fort Buford Indian Reservation, from northern North Dakota. Many others moved to Spirit Lake Reservation in North Dakota. Most remained in the Great Falls, Montana and Lewistown, Montana regions.



It was reported that the Trenton Chippewa's were allotted 131,000 acres in Williams County, North Dakota where part of the Fort Buford Indian Reservation is. In fact, the 131,000 acres is probably that part of the Fort Buford Indian Reservation located in Williams County, North Dakota. The United States allowed some mixed bloods to settle on the Reservation to corrupt the Chippewa's. By the 1970s, the Chippewa's owned only around 22,000 acres of the original 131,000 acres allotted them in Williams County, North Dakota.



Commencing in 1905, or about a year after the infamous 10 cent an acre Treaty or McCumber Agreement was ratified, over 3,000 Chippewa's applied for land allotments at the Glasgow, Montana land office. Over 400,000 acres was allotted them. When you take into consideration the 131,000 acres allotted to the Chippewa's in Williams County, North Dakota, the total acres allotted the Chippewa's is well over 500,000 acres. Fort Buford Military Reservation covered 900 sq. mi. or 576,000 acres. So the entire Chippewa Fort Buford Indian Reservation was allotted to individual Chippewa's. Exactly how much of that land remains Chippewa is not correctly known.



The Real Turtle Mountains

When Lewis and Clark passed through northwestern North Dakota in May of 1805, they were told about the Turtle Mountains or just Turtle Mountain as they were often called during those times. Today, the Turtle Mountains Lewis and Clark wrote of in their journals, are known as the Killdeer Mountains which are located in what is now Dunn County, North Dakota. However, north and west of the Killdeer Mountains are other mountains. In fact, the foothills of the Rocky Mountains commence in northwestern North Dakota within the southern portion of the Chippewa Fort Buford Indian Reservation. They lead into Montana and follow the east side of the Yellowstone River to the Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation where the Rocky Mountains are.



On the wikipedia map below, you will find the Turtle Mountain Land Allotments including the Trenton Indian Service Area Land Allotments where the red dots are located in far northeastern Montana (Sheridan County which borders Canada and North Dakota - far eastern Roosevelt County which is where much of the Fort Peck Reservation is, and Richland County - and Divide, McKenzie, and Williams Counties in North Dakota).



Most of the Chippewa's of these land allotments possibly live in North Dakota. Williston, North Dakota has around 400 Chippewa's living there. Trenton, North Dakota has close to 300 Chippewa's. Trenton is the main settlement for these allotments. Trenton is about 52% Indian and 48% white. Trenton is a lost cause. It is too mixed. They will identify as white rather than Indian. It has the appearance of a fine looking settlement but it does have its share of gravel roads as you will see in the Trenton google earth photographs. I have tried contacting the Trenton Indian Service Area about the land allotments but was told i would have to contact the Chippewa allotties to learn if it is possible to exploit the land. If you like to help me attempt to learn more about this obvious cover-up, use the contact link to email me. The Chippewa population in Sheridan County, Montana is only around 40. You know something is wrong if Sheridan County only has 40 or so Chippewa's, by seeing how many Chippewa land allotments are located in Sheridan County on the wikipedia map below. Below is an 1892 map of North Dakota which shows the Fort Buford Military Reservation. Of course, that is the real Turtle Mountain Chippewa Reservation of Montana and North Dakota.







Trenton Indian Service Area

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Demographics of the Trenton Indian Service Area (the Turtle Mountain Reservation of Montana and North Dakota)

Covers 900 sq. mi. or 576,000 acres.

Population is over 3,200. Most are Chippewa's, with the remainder being Arikara, Assiniboine, Crow (Hidatsa), and Mandan.

Settlements

Trenton: Population is 524. The small mountain range which begins in eastern Montana ends in the Trenton area as you can tell by the google earth photos.

South Trenton: It's population is included with that of Trenton. South Trenton is a mile southwest of Trenton. South Trenton has about 30 housing units and a population of possibly around 90 to 100.

Trenton has around 175 or more housing units and covers an area of several sq. mi. A few Chippewa's are farming on some of their land allotments around Trenton. From the Trenton office, the affairs of the Chippewa's in the Trenton Indian Service Area, are carried out. However, the Trenton Indian Service Area is considered to be a part of the Turtle Mountain Reservation. There are several businesses in Trenton, as well as a school, along with the Trenton Indian Service Area Tribal office. Since the community is doing fairly well economically, the average household size should be around 3.0 persons per housing unit. At the present time, the ogimak of the Trenton Indian Service Area are trying to gain their own Reservation status. Below are links to several photohraphs of the Anishinabe town of Trenton.



Trenton Full Photograph From Above

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

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Road Closeup Photograph




South Trenton Full Photograph From Above

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph


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