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Donate to our cause! Money donated will be used to create a government for "Our Selected Land" and other private ventures including agriculture, ect. We are the "Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana." We have to follow chief Rocky Boy, if we are to follow prophesy!



Wind River Reservation


This Ojibway Reservation has a troubling past. Below is a map of Wind River Reservation, links to google earth photos of Fort Washakie, it's demographics which are very difficult to determine correctly. It was supposedly established in 1868 for Shoshone People (we know they are Ojibway) only. Leaders and citizens of Wind River Reservation, can go on pretending they are other peoples. We have been told to find evidence along a trail by prophecy. That's what we are doing. Lewis & Clark wrote their Eastern Indians Estimates during their stay in North Dakota in 1804-1805. They wrote about an Ojibway People living in Oklahoma and Texas they named Chipaway and Pania. They were in an alliance. They also wrote there was a north Chipaway and Pania and south Chipaway and Pania. We take that to mean Northern Arapahoe and Southern Arapahoe and Northern Cheyenne and Southern Cheyenne. We know a group of Shoshone People left their native lands in Montana and Wyoming, and forced their way southeast to Oklahoma and Texas. In Oklahoma and Texas they are known as Comanche. In 1877, Northern Arapaho were forced by American leaders to relocate to Wind River Reservation. All was not well because many Shoshone People had a feeling of ill attitude towards those Shoshone People that selected to fight. Chief Washakie became an American ally in 1868. Over time, however, many Shoshone People would start to view whites as Arapahoe People did. That happended in early 20th century. Both Arapahoe and Shoshone are Ojibway. Maps of Northern Cheyenne Reservation below will help Shoshone People realize their true nationality. Cheyenne People are Ojibway's who lived in southern Minnesota. They forced their way out to South Dakota and Nebraska, in mid or late 17th century. They eventually migrated to Colorado, Kansas, Montana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and Wyoming regions. Shoshone is derived from an Ojibway word pertaining to south or southerner. That is Shaw-an and Shaw-an-ni. Whites dropped "an" from Shaw-an-ni and just pronounced it as Shaw-ni. As for "sho" in Shoshone, it may have a relationship with "west southwest or simply southwest." And read Andrew Blackbirds 1887 book "History of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan." Blackbird wrote that Ojibway Language was extensively spoken among Shoshone People.



1896 Great Falls Deportations

In 1896, American negotiators snuck up to Ojibway leaders of Wind River Reservation and commenced to speak to them in their famous forked tongue language. They proposed to Ojibway leaders to have an area of their Reservation, at Big Horn Hot Springs near Thermopolis, set aside as a National Park or some sort of Reservation to be under government control. Ojibway leaders were impressed with this idea of an area of their country being set aside as a National Park or a Reservation to protect Big Horn Hot Springs. In 1896, American leaders forced several thousand Ojibway People living around Great Falls, Montana, to relocate elsewhere. One location was Wind River Reservation. They settled in WRR's mountainous area or northern portion of Wind River Reservation, west of Thermopolis. They also settled between Morton and Riverton. There is a reason why Arapaho People outnumber Shoshone People at Wind River Reservation. Algonquin's make up 70% of Wind River Reservations Indian population, while Shoshone People make up 30%. Ojibway's settled Wind River Reservation north, which today has few people living there. It is an extremely rugged and mountainous land. In 1902, Algonquin's made up 50% of this Reservations population, while Shoshone People also made up 50% of this Reservations population.



On August 26, 1872, greedy American leaders reached an agreement with Shoshone leaders for ceding extreme southern part of Wind River Reservation. It is known as Lander Purchase Act of 1872. This occurred before Arapaho's settled on this Reservation. Many Ojibway's were yet at war against whites at that time (1872). On March 3, 1891, American leaders attempted to force both Shoshone and Arapaho leaders, to cede their Reservations land north of Wind River or Big Wind River. However, they refused. Quite unlike what occurred in Oklahoma where Arapaho and Cheyenne leaders ceded their Oklahoma land to United States yet without proper Ojibway Government ratification. That occurred on March 3, 1891. Many Oklahoma Ojibway's fled to northern Mexico afterwards. American leaders tried again in 1893 to coerce Ojibway leaders into ceding much of their Reservation but they refused. Below is a map of that portion of Wind River Reservation created in 1896, north of Wind River or Big Wind River, that was supposedly opened to white settlement on August 15, 1906. It was really set aside for chief Rocky Boy's landless Ojibway Subjects. Chief Rocky Boy wrote a letter to President Roosevelt on January 14, 1902, requesting for new Ojibway Reservations yet was denied. He told President Roosevelt he was leader of landless Ojibway's living in various parts of the United States. After being told no new Reservations would be set aside, chief Rocky Boy then requested that his Ojibway Subjects be allowed to settle on land not surveyed. American leaders accepted his proposal. On August 15, 1906, President Roosevelt's Proclamation gave Wind River Reservations northern portion to chief Rocky Boy's landless Ojibway Subjects. Around 1,000 Ojibway People from Montana, commenced to relocate by horse, to Wind River Reservation. In October 1906, they became very discontent. A large portion wanted to continue their migration yet another large group wanted to return to Montana. Those that wanted to return to Montana were captured a few miles east of Northern Cheyenne Reservation. This event is known as Ute Exodus of 1906. Many Ojibway's reached Wind River Reservation. However, those that were captured were sent to Pine Ridge Reservation and Cheyenne River Reservation. Most were sent to Cheyenne River Reservation where they were set aside their own Reservation.



Fort Washakie Road View

Fort Washakie Road View

Fort Washakie Road View

Fort Washakie Road View

Fort Washakie Road View

Fort Washakie Road View

Fort Washakie Road View

Fort Washakie Road View













Demographics of Wind River Reservation

Land Area: 2,812.5 sq. mi. or 7,284.3 sq. km.

Population: 5,759

Indian: 5,046 (it includes mixed bloods and Mexicans)

White: 604 (won't include Johnstown's white population)

Black: 6

Asian: 3

Language is Corrupted

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