Yakima Reservation


Created on June 9, 1855, Yakima Reservation is home to a large population that is predominantly Mexican. It wasn't that way before World War II. Below is a map of Yakima Reservation (it's boundaries must extend further west near Mount Saint Helens and further north near Mount Rainier), links to google earth photos of White Swan and demographics of this Reservations land and people. Yakima Reservation history is interesting. June 9, 1855's Treaty created this Ojibway Reservation yet shortly after it's establishment, a short war followed. What caused that war is not precisely known. However, it was possibly about where Yakima Reservation was to be located. Ojibway leaders and other Tribes leaders, knew from earlier treaties that established Reservations located on land abundant with excellant farmland, would attract whites who would then demand their Reservations. To shorten this, Yakima leaders wanted land whites didn't. That meant desert lands, mountainous lands and wetlands. They knew their Reservations eastern portion contained much farmland. They didn't want it. They disputed a new boundary for their Reservation yet American leaders refused to cooperate. It isn't ridiculous. It's well known that Reservations with excellant land, attracted whites who demanded their Reservations. Today, Yakima Reservation native Indian population is a minority within their own nation. That's because they were forced to accept their Reservations eastern portion, after 1855-1858's Yakima War. Most of Yakima Reservation is mountainous. However, nearly all it's population is located within that eastern portion with an abundance of farmland. We have been told to find evidence along a trail by prophecy. That's what we are doing. In 1878, American leaders broke treaty with Malheur Reservation (it was located in Oregon) leaders and eradicated Malheur Reservation which was home to Shoshone People who we know are Ojibway. It was also home to Ute People. After 1878's short Bannock War, anywhere from 500 to 2,000 Ojibway's from Malheur Reservation, were relocated to Yakima Reservation. They did not leave after settling down to live at Yakima Reservation. Historians may claim otherwise yet they didn't leave.



On January 14, 1902, chief Rocky Boy wrote a letter to President Roosevelt telling him he was leader of landless Chippewa Indians in various parts of the United States, that needed Reservations. His request for new Ojibway Reservations was denied. Chief Rocky Boy then requested to have his Ojibway Subjects settle on land not surveyed. American leaders accepted his proposal. On December 21, 1904, President Roosevelt added 293,837 acres or 459.1 sq. mi. or 118,911.6 hectares or 1,189.1 sq. km. to Yakima Reservations west portion. This land addition was supposedly excluded by an erroneous (incorrect) boundary survey. This land addition of 293,837 acres was approved by Secretary of the Interior on April 7, 1900. Chief Rocky Boy was already negotiating for his landless Ojibway Subjects before 1902. Possibly as early as 1899. Land acts reduced Yakima Reservation to a land mostly belonging to this Reservation with about a fifth of it's land area was becoming "Fee Land." Fee land is land owned by both Indians and non Indians, while trust land is owned by Indians or held in "trust status" by American leaders. Most "fee land" is probably located in YR's east. When June 9, 1855's Treaty was ratified on March 8, 1859, Yakima Reservation had a land area of 1.4 million acres or 2,187.5 sq. mi. or 5,665.6 sq. km. However, there's evidence Yakima Reservation has a land area of 1.8 million acres or 2,812.5 sq. mi. or 7,284.3 sq. km. As mentioned, 293,837 acres was restored in 1904 for chief Rocky Boy's Ojibway Subjects. Yakima Reservation must extend 85 miles or 136.8 kilometers from east to west, to a location a few miles east of Mount Saint Helens and further north near Mount Rainier. White Salmon River is it's west boundary. A little over 1.0 million acres is held in trust by American leaders. Over 260,000 acres or 406.2 sq. mi. or 1,052.2 sq. km. is fee land. Nearly 100% of Yakima Reservations "Fee Land" is owned by non Indians. Glenwood must not be located within Yakima Reservation. Where Klickitat River (now known as White Salmon River and was originally named Wawumchee River) enters Yakima Reservation, it must follow it's course to Klickitat Counties north boundary. It must then follow Klickitat Counties north boundary west to White Salmon River. And ,no, White Salmon River is not Klickitat River. It was originally named Klickitat River however. Yakima Reservation leaders must allow Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians to claim it's west boundary for Yakima Reservation. They must claim their nations north boundary on their own. It's a few miles south of Mount Rainier.



White Swan Road View

White Swan Road View

White Swan Road View

White Swan Road View

White Swan Road View

White Swan Road View

White Swan Road View

White Swan Road View

White Swan Road View

White Swan Road View







Demographics of Yakima Reservation

Land Area: 2,812.5 sq. mi. or 7,284.3 sq. km.

Population: 31,145 (2017 Estimate)

Indian: 7,290

Mexican: 17,231

White: Not Correctly Known

Black: 211

Asian: 612

Mixed: 1,157

Language is Corrupted

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