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Portage la Prairie Ojibway Reserve


First of the numbered Treaties between Ojibway Nation and Canada, Treaty 1 set aside this large Ojibway Reserve in extreme southern Manitoba. Below is a map of Portage la Prairie Ojibway Reserve, links to google earth photos of Long Plain and demographics of this Ojibway Reserve. Chief Yellow Quill stationed Ojibway Soldiers near Portage la Prairie to prevent whites, Eskimos and mixed bloods from expanding west or leaving Red River Colony. As a result of strong Ojibway protests, Canada agreed to negotiate a treaty agreement. Chief Yellow Quill demanded large Ojibway Reserves, in exchange for ceding Ojibway land in what is now Manitoba. Canada was having problems with leaders of Red River Colony that wanted to join Canada. They were led by "Greedy and Selfish" Louis Riel. They were very impatient which is why chief Yellow Quill stationed Ojibway Soldiers near Portage la Prairie. It took time to negotiate a treaty. Canada had to deal with Louis Riel who was very inclined to act on his own. After Louis Riel was prevented from causing a possible war, Treaty 1 was negotiated on August 3, 1871. Canada agreed, per treaty agreements, to set aside two large Ojibway Reserves in southern Manitoba, in exchange for an Ojibway land cession in extreme southern Manitoba. The two large Ojibway Reserves are Clandeboye Ojibway Reserve (Brokenhead, Fort Alexander and Peguis) and Portage la Prairie Ojibway Reserve. Both are named after "Agencies" that managed them.



Included within Portage la Prairie Ojibway Reserve are Long Plain, Roseau River, Sandy Bay and Swan Lake. Ojibway leaders were warned about white leaders. They went to treaty negotiations knowing white leaders used "Deceit." They expected lies! There are no Ojibway historical documents about Treaty 1. And they did have historical documents of every treaty they reached with white leaders. Supposedly Roseau River and Sandy Bay had no affiliations with Long Plain and Swan Lake. However, they definitely did. Use google earth to find this Reserve's location on your own. It has an abundance of woodlands and on it's southwest, land that appears to be land suited for livestock. Of course, Canada refused to honor treaty which is why this is not resolved! Swan Lake is yet located at this Ojibway Reserves west. Indian Gardens is located at it's east, south of Long Plain. Dakota Plains is also within Portage la Prairie Ojibway Reserve. Citizens of Dakota Plains are Ojibway's from Minnesota that fled to Canada during 1862's Ojibway War against Red River Colony and the United States. Their brainwashed! It was reported that Ojibway's were yet Pagans at these Ojibway communities well into the 20th century! Populations are from Dakota Plains, Long Plain, Roseau River and Swan Lake.



Long Plain Road View

Long Plain Road View

Long Plain Road View

Long Plain Road View

Long Plain Road View

Long Plain Road View

Long Plain Road View

Long Plain Road View







Demographics of Portage la Prairie Ojibway Reserve

Land Area: 500 sq. mi. or 1,295 sq. km. (estimate)

Population: 2,350 (from 2016 census)

Language: Ojibway



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