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Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


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Black River Swan Creek Chippewa's


These Anishinabe people are the famous Cherokee. However, they are really Anishinabe or Algonquian. The Cherokee and many other Iroquois Tribes, formed alliances with the whites and helped the whites colonize North America. They even joined white soldiers to fight against the mighty Native American. It was not the Cherokee who went off on the so called Cherokee Trail of Tears, in 1838-1839, it was the Black River and Swan Creek Chippewa's who commenced the so called 1838-1839 Trail of Tears. They were led by ogima Eshtonoquot. He is also known as Francis Mahkoonse. In Ojibwa, Mah-koonse means Little Bear and Young Bear. White soldiers did not round up the Anishinabe people of southern Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio and marched them to Kansas and Oklahoma. It was the Seven Fires Prophecy! Around 100,000 or more Anishinabe people from southern Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio were ordered by their ogimak to pack their belongings to commence a westward exodus. It occurred in 1838-1839. They reached the Kansas and Oklahoma region in 1839 and joined with the Anishinabek who had already been living there. They eventually migrated into Texas, then northern Mexico. Many also migrated straight west into Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, Arizona, and then southern California. Most fled to Mexico.





There are three groups of Black River Swan Creek Chippewa's. One is federally recognized in Michigan. We will research the other two. On May 9, 1836, an illegal treaty was signed between the Ojibwa Nation and the United States. On November 17, 1807, the Black River and Swan Creek Chippewa's supposedly agreed to cede land and accept 4 Reservations. Ojibwa leaders did not sign that November 17, 1807 Treaty. Why? Because of the War of 1812. Many of the major battles fought in the War of 1812, were fought in the domain of the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's. Their domain was located in southern Michigan, Ohio, Indiana and southern Ontario. After signing the illegal May 9, 1836 Treaty, Ojibwa leaders were under the impression Reservations were created for them in their domain. They soon found out otherwise. These Ojibwa's from Michigan and Ohio were very dangerous. They were yet powerful at that time. They were prophecy weary or followed prophecy. According to the May 9, 1836 Treaty, after ceding the four Reservations, the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's were to receive an 8,320 acre Reservation west of the Mississippi or NW. of St. Anthony Falls which is located at Minneapolis, Minnesota. Now, that was just one of many discrepancies. Besides the illegal May 9, 1836 Treaty, we also have to include the September 26, 1833 Treaty for obvious reasons.



Black River and Swan Creek Chippewa's of Montana

Many migrated to Montana. There are non federally recognized Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's in Montana trying to gain federal recognition. They are also known in Montana as the Northern Cheyenne. We only need to read about the Cheyenne Exodus of 1877-1879 to Montana, from Kansas and Oklahoma, to learn that the Northern Cheyenne are in fact the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's of Montana. After settling down in Montana, the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's became upset after the United States forced their children to attend white boarding schools where they were brainwashed or forced to lose their Anishinabe Nationality. To hold onto their Ojibwa Nationality, they took their children and left the Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation. They eventually amalgamated with the Ojibwa's led by ogima Rocky Boy and ogima Little Bear. Remember that Mahkoonse means Little Bear in Ojibwa. We know chief Little Bear's parents originally lived in the Wisconsin region. They left after ceding their land with the signing of the September 26, 1833 Treaty. They moved to the 5 million acre Ojibwa Reservation located in Iowa, Minnesota and Missouri. After the United States illegally eradicated the 5 million acre Ojibwa Reservation on June 5, 1846, the Ojibwa's followed prophecy and migrated west to what is now the Salt Lake City, Utah region. They also migrated to the region between Los Angeles and San Bernardino, California and Hawaii. Most fled to Mexico.



Black River and Swan Creek Chippewa's of Kansas

Many also moved to Kansas where large Reservations were set aside for them. One adjacent to and south of the very small Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa Reservation in Franklin County, Kansas. Now, that Ojibwa Reservation located in Kansas, adjacent to and south of the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa Reservation in Franklin County, Kansas, has an obvious cover-up in place. On Kansas Indian Reservations and land cessions maps, it has the number 266. It is correct to let on that the June 5, 1846 Treaty, that the United States is duping you because they made no mention of the land area in Kansas with the number 266 in the September 26, 1833 Treaty. According to the June 5, 1846 Treaty, the Ojibwa's were to cede the land area in Kansas with the number 266. They wrote it this way: Also all that tract of country lying and being on or near the Osage River and W. of the State of Missouri. Why that is important to the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's of Kansas and Montana, is their small Reservation in Franklin County, Kansas, was adjacent to the Ojibwa Reservation in Kansas with the land area number 266. In fact, it is (the Ojibwa Reservation in Kansas with the land area number 266) the real Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa Reservation of Kansas. Since it was included with the signing of the June 5, 1846 Treaty, it represents it being created as an Ojibwa Reservation on that date.



They made no mention of the land area in Kansas with the number 266, in the May 9, 1836 Treaty nor the September 26, 1833 Treaty. It is only mentioned in the June 5, 1846 Treaty. According to the June 5, 1846 Treaty, we have to read the February 11, 1837 Treaty, to find out about the land area in Kansas with the land area number 266. It is written this way in the February 11, 1837 Treaty: The U. S. agree to convey by patent to the Potawatomies of Indiana a tract of country on the Osage river SW. of the Missouri river sufficient in extent an adapted to their habits and wants. It is also written in the February 11, 1837 Treaty which was written after Kansas became a State, that the Reservation was located in Kansas and the Indians removed to it in 1840 but ceded it by signing the June 5, 1846 Treaty. As you can tell, there is a cover-up. In Kansas, the land area with the number 266, has the Little Osage River flowing through it. It gives you the impression that the Reservation created by the February 11, 1837 Treaty, is located in southwest Missouri. They, the United States, did not follow specific treaties they made with the Ojibwa's. Instead they resorted to obvious cover-ups. It is flabbergasting if you don't know about these old treaties. If you read the September 24, 1829 Treaty, the Delaware supposedly ceded two land tracts in southwest Missouri. That be the area along the Osage River in southwest Missouri.



We also have to deal with the October 11, 1842 Treaty because of the June 5, 1846 Treaty. It is written this way in the June 5, 1846 Treaty: The reserve assigned the Sauk and Fox by treaty of October 11, 1842, overlaps this tract. Of course, they mean the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa Reservation including the one with the land area number 266. It means it's a part of the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa Reservation of Kansas. The July 16, 1859 Treaty created the Ojibwa Reservation in the Chippewa Hills in Franklin County, Kansas. However, what happened to the Ojibwa Reservation in Kansas where the land area number 266 is? It is mentioned in the June 5, 1846 Treaty then forgotten. And according to the June 5, 1846 Treaty, the Ojibwa's and Ottawa's, were to unite with the Potawatomi and become the Potawatomi Nation. That alone led to all kinds of unrest among the prophecy weary Ojibwa's, who also had to deal with the July 16, 1859 Treaty which allowed the Christian Moravian Munsee to unite with them on their Reservation. Today, instead of cooperating with the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's of Kansas, the Moravian Munsee are acting on their own to gain federal recognition. Remember by the July 19, 1859 Treaty, the Christian Munsee became united with the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's. They are breaking treaty agreements. So instead of following one specific treaty, the United States made blunders which, when carefully investigated, lead to the Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa's of Kansas and Montana. Ojibwa leaders never ceded their large Reservation in Kansas. Below is a map of the real Swan Creek and Black River Chippewa Reservation of Kansas. It has the numbers 266, 417, 418, 419 and 494.





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