Algonquian Tribes | Communities | First Nations | Ojibway Indians History | Reservations | Tribes




Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


Click Here To Donate




Kootenai Indians


These people are important to the Anishinabe people. According to some Kootenai they originally lived in the Michigan region. These Anishinabe people are the evidence of an Anishinabe migration from the Great Lakes region to the Alberta, British Columbia, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington region. And we know of at least one group of Anishinabe people who migrated to western Montana. It occurred in 1816. White historians have gone to great lengths to corrupt this issue.

Chief Ignace Paul the Elder

It is very important for Anishinabe people to not accept what white historians have written about chief Ignace Paul and the group of Chippewa's he led to the Bitterroot Valley of Montana in 1816. They claim chief Ignace Paul was an Iroquois who lived near Montreal which is a lie. Read the Seven Fires Prophecy! After the War of 1812, many Chippewa's from the Great Lakes region commenced a westward migration as told to do in the Seven Fires Prophecy. Chief Ignace Paul led a small group to Montana. Other Chippewa's followed. Chief Ignace Paul was probably a mixed blood (Metis). He was apparently fond of Christianity. In the 1830s, he requested for white Christian Missionaries to be sent to the Bitterroot Valley. He became impatient then commenced another trip to St. Louis to again request that Christian Missionaries be sent to the Bitterroot Valley of Montana. Unknown to chief Ignace Paul was a group of Chippewa's who did not like what he was doing. They murdered him. His son took over and the mistake worked out.



Chief Ignace Paul the Younger

Chief Ignace Paul the Elder's son, Ignace Paul the Younger, followed through with his fathers wish that Christian Missionaries be sent to the Bitterroot Valley. They arrived in the early 1840s. Chief Aeneas (it is a mispronunciation of Ignace) Paul the Younger was born in 1820. In the 1840s, he was not yet an important leader. That changed by the 1850s. During the time of the treaty negotiations for the July 16, 1855 Hell Gate Treaty, chief Aeneas Paul may have signed the treaty. Years before, the white Christian Missionaries were driven out of the Bitterroot Valley by Chippewa soldiers. Chippewa leaders allowed the Christian Missionaries to convert their people but they soon realized they were really looking after themselves.



After these Anishinabe people settled down in western Montana, they merged with the native Chippewa's of the region and the non Algonquin Indian Tribes. They expanded westward into the north of Idaho then into Oregon and Washington. They also settled in Alberta and British Columbia. And they continued to live on the plains of Alberta and Montana. Although most Kootenai accept the history the whites have written for them, those Kootenai who know about the migration from Michigan to Montana and the Seven Fires prophecy, will accept being Anishinabe. Even in the late 1880s, the Kootenai were living throughout the entire land area of the 1855 Hell Gate Treaty. Convincing evidence the 1855 Hell Gate Treaty actually set aside the entire land area of the 1855 Hell Gate Treaty to be a Reservation.





Lower Kootenai (Columbia Lake Band) First Nation of British Columbia - it is near Creston

This Kootenai settlement is located in the beautiful mountains of southeastern British Columbia. The first google earth photograph is a good example of just how narrow some of these mountain valleys in British Columbia, are. In the third google earth photograph you can see the Idaho border. Idaho is not too far off. All photographs are google earth (no road close ups).



Lower Kootenai First Nation Photograph

Lower Kootenai First Nation Photograph

Lower Kootenai First Nation Photograph

Lower Kootenai First Nation Photograph

Population is 124

Language is Algonquian-Wakashan



Akisqnuk First Nation of British Columbia - it is near Windermere

This Kootenai settlement is located in a beautiful mountain valley in southeastern British Columbia. Windermere Lake is in this beautiful mountain valley. It is located around 110 miles north of northwestern Montana. The last four photographs are of road close ups.



Akisqnuk Google Earth

Akisqnuk Google Earth

Akisqnuk Google Earth

Akisqnuk Google Earth

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Population is 153

Language is Algonquian-Wakashan



St. Mary's First Nation of British Columbia - it is near Cranbrook

This Kootenai settlement is located near Cranbrook, British Columbia which is about 40 miles north of the Montana border. It is located in the beautiful mountains near the Cranbrook region.



St. Mary's Google Earth

St. Mary's Google Earth

St. Mary's Google Earth

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Population is 164

Language is Algonquian-Wakashan



Tobacco Plains First Nation of British Columbia - it is near Grasmere

This Kootenai settlement is located in another beautiful mountain valley in southeastern British Columbia. Loon Lake is located near this Kootenay settlement. It is just north of northwestern Montana. There are no road close ups of the Tobacco Plains Kootenai settlement.



Tobacco Plains Google Earth

Tobacco Plains Google Earth

Tobacco Plains Google Earth

Tobacco Plains Google Earth

Tobacco Plains Google Earth

Population is 67

Language is Algonquian-Wakashan



Shuswap-Kootenai First Nation of British Columbia - it is near Invermere

This Kootenai and Shuswap settlement, is located near the Kootnai First Nation of Akisqnuk and Windermere Lake, in the same beautiful mountain valley in southeastern British Columbia. The last 6 photographs are of road close ups. The region is one that is especially beautiful.



Shuswap-Kootenai Google Earth

Shuswap-Kootenai Google Earth

Shuswap-Kootenai Google Earth

Shuswap-Kootenai Google Earth

Shuswap-Kootenai Google Earth

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Population is 169

Language is Algonquian-Wakashan



Flathead Reservation of Montana

Elmo is the primary Kootenai town on the Flathead Reservation. It is situated on the western shores of Flathead Lake. However, we know the Kootenai lived in the Bitterroot Valley. The Chippewa's were forced out of the Bitterroot Valley in 1891. That obviously means the Kootenai live throughout the Flathead Reservation. The photographs gives you an indication on just how cloudy and dreary it gets in that region of Montana. Don't let that fool you! In the spring, summer, and fall the Flathead Reservation is a very beautiful place. Photograps 3 through 10, are road close ups.



Elmo Google Earth

Elmo Google Earth

Elmo Google Earth

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Population is 6,999

Language is Algonquian-Wakashan



Kootenay Reservation of Idaho

It is located in extreme northern Idaho, just north of Bonners Ferry, Idaho, and a few miles from the British Columbia border. It is another Kootenai settlement in one of the many beautiful mountain valleys that are found throughout Kootenay country. This Reservation was not established until 1974. Funny thing about these people of the Idaho Kootenai Tribe, is their oral history about their ancestors not ceding their land. That is another indication that they are Anishinabe.



Kootenai Idaho Google Earth

Kootenai Idaho Google Earth

Kootenai Idaho Google Earth

Kootenai Idaho Google Earth

Kootenai Idaho Google Earth

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Road Close Up

Population is 164

Language is Algonquian-Wakashan



Coeur d'Alene Reservation of Idaho

It is located south of the Kootenai Reservation near Bonners Ferry, Idaho. Though the Kootenai are not listed as living on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation we know they do! They live primarily at De Smet and Plummer.



Population is 1,251

Language is Algonquian-Wakashan



Colville-Spokan Reservation of Washington

It is located to the northwest of Spokane, Washington. The Kootenai are one of several tribes who live on the Colville-Spokan Reservation. It is quite similar to the Confederated Tribes of the Flathead Reservation.



Population is 4,528

Language is Algonquian-Wakashan


Free Book


The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




Contact


2009-2017 Anishinabe-History.Com