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Seven Fires Prophecy


Survival Mode


For the last several months, the whites have let known what is now the road they are going down. We can't tell the whites what road to go down. We know it will be the whites who make the decisions. It is very obvious that the whites including white Indians, are convinced going down the wrong road is their salvation. We must now commence Survival Mode. China must increase their military strength in and near non white nations including the Ark or Bow, China is in now, to prepare non white nations for survival. China will bring non white nations to the future. It is crucial that China prepare them for the event mentioned in the Seven Fires Prophecy and Revelation. We must take the warnings seriously. You must now prepare them for survival.






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Ojibway Indians of Manitoba


Below is a list of the Anishinabe Indians of Manitoba. It includes the northern Ojibwa People known as the Mus-ke-go-walk which means Swamp People or Swampy People. Later, the whites named them the Swampy Cree. Woodland Cree are included. We know the Cree are in fact Ojibwa. According to the 19th century Ojibwa author Peter Jones, the Cree speak Ojibwa or Anishinabe. It also includes the Chipewyan who are Chippewa. Chipewyan is another pronunciation of Chippewa. It is pronounced as Chip-ah-wan. The "n" indicates a plural. In the late 17th century, the white invaders used Hudson Bay to visit the land around Hudson Bay. They also brought an Asian people to the northern Hudson Bay region to fight the Ojibwa. They first brought the Asian people (the Eskimo) to Alaska from a location in southeast Asia. At that time (the 17th century), the Ojibwa People were still in contact with the Ojibwa People of Siberia. What followed was the Northwest Passage War. Chippewa soldiers kept the Eskimo confined to the immediate regions near the Bering Sea and Beaufort Sea. By the late 18th century, the white invaders were increasing their visits to the area where the mouth of the McKenzie River is. All the while, they continued to bring more Eskimo to the region between the Bering Sea and Hudson Bay. Chippewa soldiers prevented the white invaders from expanding their trade posts inland until the early 1770s.





In 1774, the white invaders and their Eskimo allies, established a trading post in southeastern Saskatchewan. It expanded the conflict known as the Revolutionary War. It was known as Cumberland House. An escalation in fighting commenced which extended as far south as Montana and North Dakota. It was during the 1770s or 1780s, when the first whites visited what is now Montana. It was probably from the Cumberland House, Saskatchewan region. Both the white invaders and their Eskimo allies, used either the Churchill River or Nelson River, to invade southeast Saskathewan. They were not wanted there by the Ojibway People who knew from prophecy the whites had evil intentions. After establishing Cumberland House, the whites brought well armed Eskimo soldiers to that region to fight the Ojibwa People. They also increased the number of Eskimo soldiers near the mouth of McKenzie River at that time (the 1770s). However, Chippewa soldiers kept the white invaders and Eskimo people, at constant alert for combat.



Ojibwa leaders from Montana, sent many of their soldiers up to what are now Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba to bolster their military strength. By the early 19th century, the white invaders had increased the number of their forts between Alaska (the white Russians), McKenzie River region, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba. They used the Eskimo people to defend their forts. However, Chippewa soldiers prevented them from expanding. Chippewa soldiers continued to control northern Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and British Columbia. Eskimo soldiers could only expand their settlements a few miles inland from the Beaufort Sea and northwestern shores of Hudson Bay. It stayed that way until after the mid 19th century. By the late 19th century, the Eskimo soldiers were being armed with repeating rifles and revolvers and expanded further inland. They expanded as far inland as Baker Lake which is located in Nunavut, to an area just north of Great Bear lake. Land north of Contwoyto Lake, Aberdeen Lake, and Baker Lake was under Eskimo control by the late 19th century. Well over 200 miles inland from the Beaufort Sea. Many of the Eskimo were stationed at the white forts along the northwestern shores of Hudson Bay and along the McKenzie River. They tended to stay very close to the white forts. They also were brought to the white forts in inland Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta as you already know. Later, the white invaders knifed their Eskimo allies in the back. Below is a list of the Ojibwa settlements in Manitoba. Most are located within the Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation. The southern communities are located from a line just north of Lake Winnipeg, to the Manitoba-North Dakota border.

Southern Ojibwa Reserves of Manitoba


Berens River:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 2,071

Bloodvein:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,052

Brokenhead:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 670

Buffalo Point:
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Buffalo Point Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 7,442 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 33

Chemawawin:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,447

Crane River (O-Chi-Chak-Ko-Si-Pi):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 498

Dauphin River:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 246

Ebb And Flow:
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Ebb and Flow Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 11,522 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,699

Fairford (Pin-ay-mo-tang):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,211

Fisher River:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,908

Fort Alexander:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 3,346

Gamblers:
This band of Ojibway, inhabit the Gamblers Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 1,040 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 72

Garden Hill:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 3,906

Grand Rapids (Misipawistik):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,132

Hollow Water:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,006

Indian Birch (Wuskwi Sipihk):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 175

Jackhead (Ki-non-je-oh-steg-on):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 348

Keeseekoowenin:
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Keeseekoowenin Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 6,071 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 494

Lake Manitoba:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,020

Lake St. Martin:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,564

Little Black River:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 905

Little Grand Rapids:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,271

Little Saskatchewan:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 672

Long Plain-Dakota Tipi (both are connected or the same Reserve):
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Long Plain Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 8,923 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 919 with 752 (Long Plain) and 167 (Dakota Tipi)

Moose Lake (Mosakahiken):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,528

Norway House:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 4,212

Opaskwayak:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 3,166

Pauingassi:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 585

Peguis:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 3,552

Pine Creek:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,116

Poplar River:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,195

Red Sucker Lake:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 930

Rolling River:
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Rolling River Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 7,576 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 563

Roseau River:
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Roseau River Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve located in the western section of the Ojibways former territory is approximately 7,576 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,146

St. Theresa Point:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 3,798

Sandy Bay:
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Sandy Bay Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 16,456 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 3,916

Sapotaweyak:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 914

Skownan (Waterhen):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 737

Swan Lake:
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Swan Lake Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 7,057 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 579

Valley River (Too-ti-na-o-wa-zi-beeng):
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Valley River Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 11,535 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 888

Wasagamak:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,837

Waywayseecappo:
This band of Ojibways, inhabit the Lizard Point Reserve in Manitoba, Canada. The size of this Ojibway Reserve is approximately 24,856 acres.
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,509

Northern Ojibwa Reserves of Manitoba


Barren Lands:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
Language is Ojibway
Population is 417

Cross Lake:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 5,718

Fox Lake:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 220

Gods Lake:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,427

Gods River (Man-to Sip-pi):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 747

Lac Brochet:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
Language is Ojibway
Population is 898

Mathias Colomb (Pukatawagan):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
Language is Ojibway
Population is 604

Marcel Colomb:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
Language is Ojibway
Population is 226

Nelson House (Ni-sich-ah-wa-yah-sihk):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 2,846

O-pi-pon-ah-pi-win:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,092

Oxford House (Bu-ni-bon-i-bee):
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,501

Sayisi:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
Language is Ojibway
Population is 304

Shamattawa:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 1,414

Split Lake:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 2,333

War Lake:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 139

York Factory:
Ojibwa Treaty 9 Reservation Community
The Language is Ojibway
The Population is 384


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