Algonquian Tribes | Communities | First Nations | Ojibway Indians History | Reservations | Tribes




Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana Needs Your Help


Rocky Boy Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana needs funding to establish offices at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation, Fort Belknap Reservation and at Great Falls, Montana where Hill 57 Reservation is located. Our goal is to gain Tribal Recognition at Blackfeet Reservation, Crow-Northern Cheyenne Reservation, Flathead Reservation and Fort Belknap Reservation and Federal Recognition for Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians at Great Falls with Reservation. Your donation will be greatly appreciated. Below is my paypal link where you can donate to this very important cause for survival. If you are interested in becoming a member of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana, you can fill out a form here . In comments box, please include your tribal affiliation. In Montana, members of Blackfeet, Crow-Northern Cheyenne, Flathead, Fort Belknap and Rocky Boys Reservation are automatically members of Rocky Boys Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. However, if you are a member from another tribe (Reservation) your application will be approved if you have proof of membership from your tribe (Reservation).


Click Here To Donate


Yellow Quill First Nation & History


Ogima O-sow-wa-sko-gwa-nay-pi (he is better known in history as chief Yellow Quill) signed two treaty's with Canada, but history indicates that some sort of problem arose afterwards. The Yellow Quill, Kinistin's, and the Fishing Lake First Nations origins take them back to the Portage la Prairie region of Manitoba, but they now live in southern southeastern Saskatchewan. I will keep this bit of information confined to only ogima O-sow-wa-sko-gwa-na-pi or ogima Yellow Quill. He may have lived in Montana and not Manitoba. The so called 1877 Nez Perce Exodus was really an Anishinabe Exodus to the west and then to Alberta and Saskatchewan, after the United States halted the westward exodus of the Anishinabe people who followed the Seven Fires Prophecy. Most settled in the Cypress Hills region of Alberta and Saskatchewan. The whites were aware of the 10,000s of Chippewa's and other tribes in the Cypress Hills region and did not want a large Chippewa population living there. They forced the Chippewa's to relocate to several specific areas in Alberta and Saskatchewan and probably Manitoba.



Under ogima O-sow-wa-sko-gwa-na-pi's leadership were two other important leaders. One was ogima Kinistin who was the more important. The other was ogima Nipinawa. The Smith brothers were possibly affiliated with ogima Yellow Quill as well. There is historical evidence of an Anishinabe Exodus from the St. Peters Reserve near Winnipeg. And there is the historical records of the Chippewa Exodus out of the Montana region which was far more extensive or involved far more people. Of course, the whites claim it was either the Lakota or Nez Perce who fled on the exodus. Read the Seven Fires Prophecy to learn the truth. Since the exodus out of Montana involved far more Chippewa's, it likely means ogima O-sow-wa-sko-gwa-na-pi moved from Montana up to Saskatchewan. Either way don't matter because ogima O-sow-wa-sko-gwa-na-pi lived between Montana and Ontario. He was an important Anishinabe leader. He, along with ogimak Kinistin and Nipinawa, were there to help them.



After negotiating with Canadian leaders in August of 1871, the Chippewa's were supposedly set aside three Reserves in southern Manitoba. They are the Long Plain First Nation, Sandy Bay First Nation, and the Swan Lake First Nation. Sandy Bay is the most important. It is located on the fringe of the Canadian wilderness. The three First Nations are still in southern Manitoba but supposedly ogima O-sow-wa-sko-gwa-na-pi became upset then gathered his people for an exodus to the west into Saskatchewan. Specifically the Qu' Appelle Valley or the Fishing Lakes region. That occurred in the mid 1870s, or around the time of the Chippewa Exodus out of Montana. On August 24, 1876 ogima O-sow-wa-sko-gwa-na-pi signed an adhesion to treaty 4. In September of 1881, two Reserves were set aside for the Chippewa's under Yellow Quill's leadership. They are the Fishing Lake First Nation and Yellow Quill First Nation.



Ogima Kinistin broke away and led large numbers of Chippewa's up to northern Saskatchewan and northern Manitoba. He was later set aside the Kinistin Reserve in 1900. In 1878, the Canadians set aside a Reserve 90 miles northeast of Fort Pelley which is in extreme eastern Saskatchewan, near the Manitoba border. The new Reserve was possibly located along the western shores of the northern part of Lake Winnipegosis, or where the Chemawawin Reserve is, or near the Wuskwi Sipihk Reserve, or near the Sapotaweyak Reserve, or the Pine Creek Reserve. Since the Pine Creek Reserve is still clinging to their Anishinabe identity, that is probably the Chippewa Reserve set aside in 1878. The Pine Creek Reserve is located along the southwestern shores of Lake Winnipegosis. All the Reserves or First Nations mentioned which include the Chemawawin, Pine Creek, Sapotaweyak, and the Wuskwi Sipihk and others to the north in Manitoba and Saskatchewan, were possibly established with the help of ogima Kinistin.



Historians claim floods forced them to relocate from the new Reserve set aside in 1878, to where the Cote, Keeseekoose, and The Key First Nations are which is eastern Saskatchewan. Those three First Nations were established in September of 1875, after their leaders signed an adhesion to treaty 4. They supposedly lived along the Shoal River in Manitoba. More research about the life of ogima O-sow-wa-sko-gwa-na-pi and ogima Kinistin, must be carried out to learn exactly what happened in the 1870s. I suspect they were a part of a group of several Chippewa leaders either from Montana or from the Manitoba-Ontario region, who negotiated with Canadian leaders about setting aside Reserves for the Chippewa refugees from Montana.



The Yellow Quill First Nation Reserve covers 6,156 hectares or 15,212 acres. It is located almost directly north of Montana. The Reserve population is 878. Since they are surrounded by numerous white settlements, most have moved to them to find employment. Their real country is about 1 mile to the east where the Canadian wilderness begins. The Chippewa's of the Yellow Quill Reserve continued to subsist off the land well into the 1930s. The whites killed off most of the wildlife in that region to force the Chippewa's to live on the Reserve. Pictures of their country and a link to a map of the Yellow Quill First Nation is below. Their country is a vast land covered by a forest and countless lakes.



Map




Photograph From Above

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

Road Closeup Photograph

Photograph From Above

Photograph From Above

Free Book


The Algonquian Conquest of the Mediterranean Region of 11,500 Years Ago




Contact


2009-2017 Anishinabe-History.Com