Fort Nelson First Nation


Located in far northeastern British Columbia, Fort Nelson First Nation are signatories to Treaty 8. Below are links to google earth photos of their land. According to historians, difficulties were made when attempts were made to sign treaty. Ojibway People were long established in that region and absolutely rejected any Cree Indians (aka Beaver Indians) influence. They did not want those Cree Traitors involved. Cree People are really Ojibway. They caused much civil strife among Ojibway People by siding with whites. Their real tribal name is Beaver Indians. They are also known as Keskatchewan Indians. Included as Beaver Indians are Sekani People and T'suu Tina People. Canadians experienced trouble with Ojibway's living near Fort St. John. Ojibway leaders did not want Beaver Indians involved. They knew what happened during Treaty 4, Treaty 5, Treaty 6 and Treaty 7. Cree or mixed bloods signing treaty for them or Ojibway leaders did in fact sign those treaties yet were deceived because Cree and mixed blood leaders signed away their land without their approval. In 1900, some Cree People near Fort St. John, signed Treaty 8 and it enraged Ojibway leaders. In 1909, they reported that civil strife was causing serious problems near Fort Nelson. Supposedly, some treaty Indians were tresspassing on Chipewyan and Sekani (that's incorrect) hunting grounds. Sekani People were attempting to sign Treaty 8 and that caused civil strife. Sekani leaders protested that Chipewyan People (aka Slavey) had no right to hunt in that part of country. Canada was also accepting many of chief Rocky Boy's landless Ojibway's in 1909. On December 18, 1909, H.A. Conroy was appointed commissioner to negotiate adhesions to Treaty 8. Three groups of Ojibway's were involved. Ojibway's native to that region (Chipewyan or Slavey), Beaver People and chief Rocky Boy's landless Ojibway's from Montana. They commenced to send chief Rocky Boy's landless Ojibway's north in November 1909. On August 15, 1910, Ojibway (Chipewyan or Slavey) leaders signed Treaty 8. Supposedly a few Sekani also signed yet that's likely a deception. Ojibway leaders warned Sekanis and Canadians, that no Sekani could participate in Treaty 8 signings. Canada ignored it. According to RMCP Sergeant R. Field, Sekani People belonged far west or where northern Rocky Mountain Trench is located in British Columbia. There are 4 Sekani First Nations in British Columbia. Fort Nelson First Nation is not one of them. Beaver People have 3 First Nations in British Columbia. They are Blueberry, Doig River and Prophet River. There's good reason to reject Prophet River as being Cree or Beaver or Sekani. As expected, Canada commenced to call Fort Nelson First Nation People Cree and Chipewyan or Slavey. They did so by bribing leaders and brainwashing their children. According to 2016's census, Fort Nelson First Nation has an on-Reserve population of 451. Their Reserve has a land area of 35.5 sq. mi. or 91.9 sq. km. However, Ojibway leaders considered 1 mile to be 1 league or 3 miles. Their Reserves correct size is 106.5 sq. mi. or 275.8 sq. km.



Fort Nelson From Road

Fort Nelson From Road

Fort Nelson From Road

Fort Nelson From Road

Fort Nelson From Road

Fort Nelson From Road

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